Low maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma in 5-year-old children

Graham Stuart Devereux, Stephen William Turner, Leone Christina Agnese Craig, Geraldine McNeill, Sheelagh Martindale, Paul J. Harbour, Peter Joseph Benedict Helms, Anthony Seaton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: We have previously reported an association between reduced maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy and wheezing in 2-yr-old children.
Objectives: To assess whether maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma-related outcomes in children aged 5 yr.
Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of 1,861 children born to women recruited during pregnancy and followed Up at 5 yr. Measurements: Maternal nutrient status was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and plasma levels. Respiratory and food frequency questionnaires were completed at 5 yr and children were invited for measurement of spirometry and skin-prick testing.
Main Results: Symptom and food frequency questionnaire data were available for 1,253 and 1,120 children, respectively; 700 children were skin prick tested, and FEV, was measured in 478 and exhaled nitric oxide in 167 children. In 5-yr-old children, maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with wheeze in previous year (odds ratio per intake quintile, 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.95), asthma ever (0.84, 0.72-0.98), asthma and wheeze in previous year (0.79, 0.65-0.95), and persistent wheezing (0.77, 0.63-0.93). Maternal plasma alpha-tocopherol during pregnancy was positively associated with post-bronchodilator FEV, at 5 yr, with a 7-ml (95% confidence interval, 0-14; p = 0.04) increase in FEV1 per mu g/ml alpha-tocopherol. Maternal zinc intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with asthma ever (0.83, 0.71-0.78) and active asthma (0.72, 0.59-0.89). There were no associations between children's nutrient intake and respiratory outcomes.
Conclusion: Maternal intake of foods containing vitamin E and zinc during pregnancy is associated with differences in the risks of developing childhood wheeze and asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-507
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume174
Early online date8 Jun 2006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • children
  • pregnancy
  • ventilatory function
  • vitamin E
  • zinc
  • nutrition examination survey
  • Dietary antioxidants
  • preschool children
  • vitamin E supplementation
  • childhood asthma
  • zinc deficiency
  • lung function
  • population
  • prevalence
  • ADAM33

Cite this

Low maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma in 5-year-old children. / Devereux, Graham Stuart; Turner, Stephen William; Craig, Leone Christina Agnese; McNeill, Geraldine; Martindale, Sheelagh; Harbour, Paul J.; Helms, Peter Joseph Benedict; Seaton, Anthony.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 174, 2006, p. 499-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ffd1195a512f42e4a4ad7bdc24cb994d,
title = "Low maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma in 5-year-old children",
abstract = "Rationale: We have previously reported an association between reduced maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy and wheezing in 2-yr-old children. Objectives: To assess whether maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma-related outcomes in children aged 5 yr. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of 1,861 children born to women recruited during pregnancy and followed Up at 5 yr. Measurements: Maternal nutrient status was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and plasma levels. Respiratory and food frequency questionnaires were completed at 5 yr and children were invited for measurement of spirometry and skin-prick testing. Main Results: Symptom and food frequency questionnaire data were available for 1,253 and 1,120 children, respectively; 700 children were skin prick tested, and FEV, was measured in 478 and exhaled nitric oxide in 167 children. In 5-yr-old children, maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with wheeze in previous year (odds ratio per intake quintile, 0.2; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.71-0.95), asthma ever (0.84, 0.72-0.98), asthma and wheeze in previous year (0.79, 0.65-0.95), and persistent wheezing (0.77, 0.63-0.93). Maternal plasma alpha-tocopherol during pregnancy was positively associated with post-bronchodilator FEV, at 5 yr, with a 7-ml (95{\%} confidence interval, 0-14; p = 0.04) increase in FEV1 per mu g/ml alpha-tocopherol. Maternal zinc intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with asthma ever (0.83, 0.71-0.78) and active asthma (0.72, 0.59-0.89). There were no associations between children's nutrient intake and respiratory outcomes. Conclusion: Maternal intake of foods containing vitamin E and zinc during pregnancy is associated with differences in the risks of developing childhood wheeze and asthma.",
keywords = "children, pregnancy, ventilatory function, vitamin E, zinc, nutrition examination survey, Dietary antioxidants, preschool children, vitamin E supplementation, childhood asthma, zinc deficiency, lung function, population, prevalence, ADAM33",
author = "Devereux, {Graham Stuart} and Turner, {Stephen William} and Craig, {Leone Christina Agnese} and Geraldine McNeill and Sheelagh Martindale and Harbour, {Paul J.} and Helms, {Peter Joseph Benedict} and Anthony Seaton",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1164/rccm.200512-1946OC",
language = "English",
volume = "174",
pages = "499--507",
journal = "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1073-449X",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society - AJRCCM",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma in 5-year-old children

AU - Devereux, Graham Stuart

AU - Turner, Stephen William

AU - Craig, Leone Christina Agnese

AU - McNeill, Geraldine

AU - Martindale, Sheelagh

AU - Harbour, Paul J.

AU - Helms, Peter Joseph Benedict

AU - Seaton, Anthony

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Rationale: We have previously reported an association between reduced maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy and wheezing in 2-yr-old children. Objectives: To assess whether maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma-related outcomes in children aged 5 yr. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of 1,861 children born to women recruited during pregnancy and followed Up at 5 yr. Measurements: Maternal nutrient status was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and plasma levels. Respiratory and food frequency questionnaires were completed at 5 yr and children were invited for measurement of spirometry and skin-prick testing. Main Results: Symptom and food frequency questionnaire data were available for 1,253 and 1,120 children, respectively; 700 children were skin prick tested, and FEV, was measured in 478 and exhaled nitric oxide in 167 children. In 5-yr-old children, maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with wheeze in previous year (odds ratio per intake quintile, 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.95), asthma ever (0.84, 0.72-0.98), asthma and wheeze in previous year (0.79, 0.65-0.95), and persistent wheezing (0.77, 0.63-0.93). Maternal plasma alpha-tocopherol during pregnancy was positively associated with post-bronchodilator FEV, at 5 yr, with a 7-ml (95% confidence interval, 0-14; p = 0.04) increase in FEV1 per mu g/ml alpha-tocopherol. Maternal zinc intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with asthma ever (0.83, 0.71-0.78) and active asthma (0.72, 0.59-0.89). There were no associations between children's nutrient intake and respiratory outcomes. Conclusion: Maternal intake of foods containing vitamin E and zinc during pregnancy is associated with differences in the risks of developing childhood wheeze and asthma.

AB - Rationale: We have previously reported an association between reduced maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy and wheezing in 2-yr-old children. Objectives: To assess whether maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma-related outcomes in children aged 5 yr. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of 1,861 children born to women recruited during pregnancy and followed Up at 5 yr. Measurements: Maternal nutrient status was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and plasma levels. Respiratory and food frequency questionnaires were completed at 5 yr and children were invited for measurement of spirometry and skin-prick testing. Main Results: Symptom and food frequency questionnaire data were available for 1,253 and 1,120 children, respectively; 700 children were skin prick tested, and FEV, was measured in 478 and exhaled nitric oxide in 167 children. In 5-yr-old children, maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with wheeze in previous year (odds ratio per intake quintile, 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.95), asthma ever (0.84, 0.72-0.98), asthma and wheeze in previous year (0.79, 0.65-0.95), and persistent wheezing (0.77, 0.63-0.93). Maternal plasma alpha-tocopherol during pregnancy was positively associated with post-bronchodilator FEV, at 5 yr, with a 7-ml (95% confidence interval, 0-14; p = 0.04) increase in FEV1 per mu g/ml alpha-tocopherol. Maternal zinc intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with asthma ever (0.83, 0.71-0.78) and active asthma (0.72, 0.59-0.89). There were no associations between children's nutrient intake and respiratory outcomes. Conclusion: Maternal intake of foods containing vitamin E and zinc during pregnancy is associated with differences in the risks of developing childhood wheeze and asthma.

KW - children

KW - pregnancy

KW - ventilatory function

KW - vitamin E

KW - zinc

KW - nutrition examination survey

KW - Dietary antioxidants

KW - preschool children

KW - vitamin E supplementation

KW - childhood asthma

KW - zinc deficiency

KW - lung function

KW - population

KW - prevalence

KW - ADAM33

U2 - 10.1164/rccm.200512-1946OC

DO - 10.1164/rccm.200512-1946OC

M3 - Article

VL - 174

SP - 499

EP - 507

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

ER -