Lower estimates of net endogenous noncarbonic acid production are positively associated with indexes of bone health in premenopausal and perimenopausal women

S. A. New, Helen Margaret MacDonald, Marion Kay Campbell, J. Martin, M. J. Garton, S. P. Robins, David M Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The link between acid-base homeostasis and skeletal integrity has gained increasing prominence in the literature. Estimation of the net rate of endogenous noncarbonic acid production (NEAP) from dietary protein and potassium content enables exploration of the effects of dietary acidity or alkalinity on bone.

Objective: The study aimed to ascertain whether lower dietary acidity (lower dietary protein intake but higher potassium intake-ie, low estimate of NEAP) was associated with greater axial and peripheral bone mass and less bone turnover, independent of key confounding factors.

Design: Baseline (cross-sectional) results of a population-based study were examined further. The database includes spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) in 1056 premenopausal or perimenopausal women aged 45-54 y and forearm bone mass and the urinary markers of bone resorption in 62 women. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure dietary intakes.

Results: Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were correlated with greater spine and hip BMD and greater forearm bone mass (P < 0.02 to P < 0.05). Hip and forearm bone mass decreased significantly across increasing quartiles of energy-adjusted NEAP (P < 0.02 to P < 0.03), and trends at the spine were similar (P < 0.09). Differences remained significant after adjustment for age, weight, height, and menstrual status. Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were also correlated with lower excretion of deoxypyridinoline and were significant predictors of spine and forearm bone mass.

Conclusions: These novel findings provide evidence of a positive link between a ratio of lower protein to higher potassium dietary intake (ie, less dietary acid) and skeletal integrity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-138
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2004

Keywords

  • bone health
  • potassium
  • protein
  • dietary acid
  • dietary alkali
  • acid-base homeostasis
  • CHRONIC METABOLIC ACIDOSIS
  • MINERAL DENSITY
  • VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION
  • CALCIUM EXCRETION
  • DIETARY PATTERNS
  • RAT OSTEOCLASTS
  • BLOOD-PRESSURE
  • PROTEIN-INTAKE
  • ELDERLY MEN
  • POTASSIUM

Cite this

Lower estimates of net endogenous noncarbonic acid production are positively associated with indexes of bone health in premenopausal and perimenopausal women. / New, S. A.; MacDonald, Helen Margaret; Campbell, Marion Kay; Martin, J.; Garton, M. J.; Robins, S. P.; Reid, David M.

In: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 79, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 131-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Lower estimates of net endogenous noncarbonic acid production are positively associated with indexes of bone health in premenopausal and perimenopausal women

AU - New, S. A.

AU - MacDonald, Helen Margaret

AU - Campbell, Marion Kay

AU - Martin, J.

AU - Garton, M. J.

AU - Robins, S. P.

AU - Reid, David M

PY - 2004/1

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N2 - Background: The link between acid-base homeostasis and skeletal integrity has gained increasing prominence in the literature. Estimation of the net rate of endogenous noncarbonic acid production (NEAP) from dietary protein and potassium content enables exploration of the effects of dietary acidity or alkalinity on bone.Objective: The study aimed to ascertain whether lower dietary acidity (lower dietary protein intake but higher potassium intake-ie, low estimate of NEAP) was associated with greater axial and peripheral bone mass and less bone turnover, independent of key confounding factors.Design: Baseline (cross-sectional) results of a population-based study were examined further. The database includes spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) in 1056 premenopausal or perimenopausal women aged 45-54 y and forearm bone mass and the urinary markers of bone resorption in 62 women. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure dietary intakes.Results: Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were correlated with greater spine and hip BMD and greater forearm bone mass (P < 0.02 to P < 0.05). Hip and forearm bone mass decreased significantly across increasing quartiles of energy-adjusted NEAP (P < 0.02 to P < 0.03), and trends at the spine were similar (P < 0.09). Differences remained significant after adjustment for age, weight, height, and menstrual status. Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were also correlated with lower excretion of deoxypyridinoline and were significant predictors of spine and forearm bone mass.Conclusions: These novel findings provide evidence of a positive link between a ratio of lower protein to higher potassium dietary intake (ie, less dietary acid) and skeletal integrity.

AB - Background: The link between acid-base homeostasis and skeletal integrity has gained increasing prominence in the literature. Estimation of the net rate of endogenous noncarbonic acid production (NEAP) from dietary protein and potassium content enables exploration of the effects of dietary acidity or alkalinity on bone.Objective: The study aimed to ascertain whether lower dietary acidity (lower dietary protein intake but higher potassium intake-ie, low estimate of NEAP) was associated with greater axial and peripheral bone mass and less bone turnover, independent of key confounding factors.Design: Baseline (cross-sectional) results of a population-based study were examined further. The database includes spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) in 1056 premenopausal or perimenopausal women aged 45-54 y and forearm bone mass and the urinary markers of bone resorption in 62 women. A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure dietary intakes.Results: Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were correlated with greater spine and hip BMD and greater forearm bone mass (P < 0.02 to P < 0.05). Hip and forearm bone mass decreased significantly across increasing quartiles of energy-adjusted NEAP (P < 0.02 to P < 0.03), and trends at the spine were similar (P < 0.09). Differences remained significant after adjustment for age, weight, height, and menstrual status. Lower estimates of energy-adjusted NEAP were also correlated with lower excretion of deoxypyridinoline and were significant predictors of spine and forearm bone mass.Conclusions: These novel findings provide evidence of a positive link between a ratio of lower protein to higher potassium dietary intake (ie, less dietary acid) and skeletal integrity.

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KW - dietary acid

KW - dietary alkali

KW - acid-base homeostasis

KW - CHRONIC METABOLIC ACIDOSIS

KW - MINERAL DENSITY

KW - VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION

KW - CALCIUM EXCRETION

KW - DIETARY PATTERNS

KW - RAT OSTEOCLASTS

KW - BLOOD-PRESSURE

KW - PROTEIN-INTAKE

KW - ELDERLY MEN

KW - POTASSIUM

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VL - 79

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EP - 138

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 1

ER -