Lower limb pain in a preadolescent population: Prognosis and risk factors for chronicity - A prospective 1- and 4- year follow-up study

Ashraf Abdel Salam El Metwally, J. J. Salminen, A. Auvinen, H. Kautiainen, M. Mikkelsson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective. To determine the short- term and long- term prognosis of preadolescent lower limb pain and to assess factors that contribute to pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and pain recurrence at 4-year follow-up.

    Methods. A 1- and 4- year follow-up was conducted of a population-based 10- and 12-year old cohort of schoolchildren with lower limb pain at baseline

    Results. Of the baseline students with lower limb pain, 32% reported pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and 31% reported pain recurrence at 4-year follow- up. Vigorous exercise was the only statistically significant predictor of lower limb pain persistence at 1-year follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16 - 5.05), whereas at 4- year follow- up (at adolescence), hypermobility was predictive of pain recurrence (OR: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.13 - 7.70). Traumatic lower extremity pain had a 50% lower risk for pain recurrence compared with nontraumatic pain (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.19 - 0.92).

    Conclusion. Trauma- induced lower extremity pain in preadolescents has a favorable long- term natural course. Children's involvement in vigorous exercise predicts short- term outcome of lower limb pain, whereas hypermobile children have a worse long- term prognosis.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)673-681
    Number of pages8
    JournalPediatrics
    Volume116
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

    Keywords

    • musculoskeletal pain
    • pain
    • prognosis
    • lower limb
    • preadolescents
    • NONSPECIFIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN
    • ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN
    • GROWING PAINS
    • NATURAL-HISTORY
    • ADOLESCENTS
    • INJURIES
    • CHILDREN
    • CHILDHOOD
    • PREVALENCE
    • SPORTS

    Cite this

    Lower limb pain in a preadolescent population: Prognosis and risk factors for chronicity - A prospective 1- and 4- year follow-up study. / El Metwally, Ashraf Abdel Salam; Salminen, J. J.; Auvinen, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Mikkelsson, M.

    In: Pediatrics, Vol. 116, No. 3, 09.2005, p. 673-681.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    El Metwally, Ashraf Abdel Salam ; Salminen, J. J. ; Auvinen, A. ; Kautiainen, H. ; Mikkelsson, M. / Lower limb pain in a preadolescent population: Prognosis and risk factors for chronicity - A prospective 1- and 4- year follow-up study. In: Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 673-681.
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    abstract = "Objective. To determine the short- term and long- term prognosis of preadolescent lower limb pain and to assess factors that contribute to pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and pain recurrence at 4-year follow-up.Methods. A 1- and 4- year follow-up was conducted of a population-based 10- and 12-year old cohort of schoolchildren with lower limb pain at baselineResults. Of the baseline students with lower limb pain, 32{\%} reported pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and 31{\%} reported pain recurrence at 4-year follow- up. Vigorous exercise was the only statistically significant predictor of lower limb pain persistence at 1-year follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.43; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.16 - 5.05), whereas at 4- year follow- up (at adolescence), hypermobility was predictive of pain recurrence (OR: 2.93; 95{\%} CI: 1.13 - 7.70). Traumatic lower extremity pain had a 50{\%} lower risk for pain recurrence compared with nontraumatic pain (OR: 0.48; 95{\%} CI: 0.19 - 0.92).Conclusion. Trauma- induced lower extremity pain in preadolescents has a favorable long- term natural course. Children's involvement in vigorous exercise predicts short- term outcome of lower limb pain, whereas hypermobile children have a worse long- term prognosis.",
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    AU - El Metwally, Ashraf Abdel Salam

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    AU - Auvinen, A.

    AU - Kautiainen, H.

    AU - Mikkelsson, M.

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    N2 - Objective. To determine the short- term and long- term prognosis of preadolescent lower limb pain and to assess factors that contribute to pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and pain recurrence at 4-year follow-up.Methods. A 1- and 4- year follow-up was conducted of a population-based 10- and 12-year old cohort of schoolchildren with lower limb pain at baselineResults. Of the baseline students with lower limb pain, 32% reported pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and 31% reported pain recurrence at 4-year follow- up. Vigorous exercise was the only statistically significant predictor of lower limb pain persistence at 1-year follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16 - 5.05), whereas at 4- year follow- up (at adolescence), hypermobility was predictive of pain recurrence (OR: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.13 - 7.70). Traumatic lower extremity pain had a 50% lower risk for pain recurrence compared with nontraumatic pain (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.19 - 0.92).Conclusion. Trauma- induced lower extremity pain in preadolescents has a favorable long- term natural course. Children's involvement in vigorous exercise predicts short- term outcome of lower limb pain, whereas hypermobile children have a worse long- term prognosis.

    AB - Objective. To determine the short- term and long- term prognosis of preadolescent lower limb pain and to assess factors that contribute to pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and pain recurrence at 4-year follow-up.Methods. A 1- and 4- year follow-up was conducted of a population-based 10- and 12-year old cohort of schoolchildren with lower limb pain at baselineResults. Of the baseline students with lower limb pain, 32% reported pain persistence at 1-year follow-up and 31% reported pain recurrence at 4-year follow- up. Vigorous exercise was the only statistically significant predictor of lower limb pain persistence at 1-year follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16 - 5.05), whereas at 4- year follow- up (at adolescence), hypermobility was predictive of pain recurrence (OR: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.13 - 7.70). Traumatic lower extremity pain had a 50% lower risk for pain recurrence compared with nontraumatic pain (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.19 - 0.92).Conclusion. Trauma- induced lower extremity pain in preadolescents has a favorable long- term natural course. Children's involvement in vigorous exercise predicts short- term outcome of lower limb pain, whereas hypermobile children have a worse long- term prognosis.

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    KW - pain

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    KW - ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN

    KW - GROWING PAINS

    KW - NATURAL-HISTORY

    KW - ADOLESCENTS

    KW - INJURIES

    KW - CHILDREN

    KW - CHILDHOOD

    KW - PREVALENCE

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    SN - 0031-4005

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