Malnutrition: trials and triumphs

B E Golden, M Corbett, R McBurney, M H Golden

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Severe malnutrition is uncommon but often fatal, particularly in very young infants or when oedema is present. Another major contributor to mortality is undiagnosed infection. Three pilot studies have recently been performed in severely malnourished patients in therapeutic feeding centres in sub-Saharan Africa. In each, a practical management problem was addressed and a potential solution tested. Three conclusions were reached: young breastfeeding infants were best managed using a supplemented suckling technique; routine antibiotics from admission reduced mortality; and in adults with oedematous malnutrition, therapeutic diets with a lower-than-usual protein:energy ratio were effective in reducing mortality and permitting catch-up weight gain.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)12-13
    Number of pages2
    JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume94
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Keywords

    • malnutrition
    • refugees
    • breastfeeding
    • antibiotics
    • mortality

    Cite this

    Malnutrition: trials and triumphs. / Golden, B E ; Corbett, M ; McBurney, R ; Golden, M H .

    In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 94, 2000, p. 12-13.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Golden, B E ; Corbett, M ; McBurney, R ; Golden, M H . / Malnutrition: trials and triumphs. In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2000 ; Vol. 94. pp. 12-13.
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