Man made deltas

Vittorio Maselli*, Fabio Trincardi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1926
Number of pages7
JournalScientific Reports
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2013

Keywords

  • Delta
  • CLIMATE-CHANGE
  • ICE-AGE
  • HUMANS

Cite this

Maselli, V., & Trincardi, F. (2013). Man made deltas. Scientific Reports, 3, [1926]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep01926

Man made deltas. / Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 3, 1926, 31.05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maselli, V & Trincardi, F 2013, 'Man made deltas', Scientific Reports, vol. 3, 1926. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep01926
Maselli V, Trincardi F. Man made deltas. Scientific Reports. 2013 May 31;3. 1926. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep01926
Maselli, Vittorio ; Trincardi, Fabio. / Man made deltas. In: Scientific Reports. 2013 ; Vol. 3.
@article{9bf6bdf3641b4cbda0a7096f3a40b850,
title = "Man made deltas",
abstract = "The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.",
keywords = "Delta, CLIMATE-CHANGE, ICE-AGE, HUMANS",
author = "Vittorio Maselli and Fabio Trincardi",
note = "Acknowledgments This work has been funded by the Flagship Project RITMARE - The Italian Research for the Sea - coordinated by the Italian National Research Council and funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research within the National Research Program 2011–2013. This is ISMAR-Bologna contribution n. 1791.",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1038/srep01926",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Man made deltas

AU - Maselli, Vittorio

AU - Trincardi, Fabio

N1 - Acknowledgments This work has been funded by the Flagship Project RITMARE - The Italian Research for the Sea - coordinated by the Italian National Research Council and funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research within the National Research Program 2011–2013. This is ISMAR-Bologna contribution n. 1791.

PY - 2013/5/31

Y1 - 2013/5/31

N2 - The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

AB - The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

KW - Delta

KW - CLIMATE-CHANGE

KW - ICE-AGE

KW - HUMANS

U2 - 10.1038/srep01926

DO - 10.1038/srep01926

M3 - Article

VL - 3

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 1926

ER -