Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species

Michael Carrington Westaway, Arthur C Durband, Colin P Groves, Mark Collard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Henneberg et al. (1) and Eckhardt et al. (2) present another pathology-based alternative to the hypothesis that the “hobbit” fossils from Liang Bua, Indonesia, represent a distinct hominin species, Homo floresiensis. They contend that the Liang Bua specimens are the remains of small-bodied humans and that the noteworthy features of the most complete specimen, LB1, are a consequence of Down syndrome (DS). Here, we show that the available mandibular evidence does not support these claims.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E604-605
Number of pages2
JournalPNAS
Volume112
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Feb 2015

Fingerprint

Hominidae
Fossils
Indonesia
Down Syndrome
Pathology

Keywords

  • Homo floresiensis
  • Liang Bua
  • LB1
  • LB6
  • Down Syndrome

Cite this

Westaway, M. C., Durband, A. C., Groves, C. P., & Collard, M. (2015). Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species. PNAS, 112(7), E604-605. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1418997112

Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species. / Westaway, Michael Carrington; Durband, Arthur C; Groves, Colin P; Collard, Mark.

In: PNAS, Vol. 112, No. 7, 17.02.2015, p. E604-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Westaway, MC, Durband, AC, Groves, CP & Collard, M 2015, 'Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species', PNAS, vol. 112, no. 7, pp. E604-605. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1418997112
Westaway MC, Durband AC, Groves CP, Collard M. Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species. PNAS. 2015 Feb 17;112(7):E604-605. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1418997112
Westaway, Michael Carrington ; Durband, Arthur C ; Groves, Colin P ; Collard, Mark. / Mandibular evidence supports Homo floresiensis as a distinct species. In: PNAS. 2015 ; Vol. 112, No. 7. pp. E604-605.
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