Marginal zinc deficiency in rats decreases leptin expression independently of food intake and corticotrophin-releasing hormone in relation to food intake

In-Sook Kwun, Young-Eun Cho, Ria-Ann R. Lomeda, Soon-Tae Kwon, Yangha Kim, John H. Beattie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Zn deficiency reduces food intake and growth rate in rodents. To determine the relationship between Zn deficiency and the regulation of food intake, we evaluated leptin gene expression in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), and hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (hCRH) and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (hNPY) of rats Zn-deficient only to show reduced food intake and growth rate but not food intake cycling. Growing male Sprague-Dawley rats (240g) were randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups: Zn-adequate (ZA; 30mg/kg diet), Zn-deficient (ZD; 3 mg/kg diet), pair-fed with ZD (PF; 30 1 mg/kg diet) and Zn-sufficient (ZS; 50 mg/kg diet) (n 8), and were fed for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured, as were blood mononuclear cells and pancreas Zn levels. eWAT leptin, hCRH and hNPY mRNA levels were determined. Food intake was decreased by about 10% in ZD and PF rats compared to ZA and ZS rats. Growth and eWAT leptin mRNA levels were unaffected in PF rats but were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in ZD rats. However, hNPY showed a tendency to increase, and hCRH significantly (P<0.05) decreased, in both ZD and PF rats. These results suggest that while leptin gene expression may be directly affected by Zn, hNPY and hCRH are likely responding to reduced food intake caused by Zn deficiency.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)485-489
    Number of pages5
    JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
    Volume98
    Issue number3
    Early online date3 May 2007
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

    Keywords

    • zinc deficiency
    • corticotrophin-releasing hormone
    • leptin
    • food intake
    • growth
    • OB gene-expression
    • neuropeptide-Y
    • adipose-tissue
    • metabolic-rate
    • plasma leptin
    • secretion
    • insulin
    • humans

    Cite this

    Marginal zinc deficiency in rats decreases leptin expression independently of food intake and corticotrophin-releasing hormone in relation to food intake. / Kwun, In-Sook; Cho, Young-Eun; Lomeda, Ria-Ann R.; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Kim, Yangha; Beattie, John H.

    In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 98, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 485-489.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Zn deficiency reduces food intake and growth rate in rodents. To determine the relationship between Zn deficiency and the regulation of food intake, we evaluated leptin gene expression in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), and hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (hCRH) and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (hNPY) of rats Zn-deficient only to show reduced food intake and growth rate but not food intake cycling. Growing male Sprague-Dawley rats (240g) were randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups: Zn-adequate (ZA; 30mg/kg diet), Zn-deficient (ZD; 3 mg/kg diet), pair-fed with ZD (PF; 30 1 mg/kg diet) and Zn-sufficient (ZS; 50 mg/kg diet) (n 8), and were fed for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured, as were blood mononuclear cells and pancreas Zn levels. eWAT leptin, hCRH and hNPY mRNA levels were determined. Food intake was decreased by about 10{\%} in ZD and PF rats compared to ZA and ZS rats. Growth and eWAT leptin mRNA levels were unaffected in PF rats but were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in ZD rats. However, hNPY showed a tendency to increase, and hCRH significantly (P<0.05) decreased, in both ZD and PF rats. These results suggest that while leptin gene expression may be directly affected by Zn, hNPY and hCRH are likely responding to reduced food intake caused by Zn deficiency.",
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    AU - Kwun, In-Sook

    AU - Cho, Young-Eun

    AU - Lomeda, Ria-Ann R.

    AU - Kwon, Soon-Tae

    AU - Kim, Yangha

    AU - Beattie, John H.

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    N2 - Zn deficiency reduces food intake and growth rate in rodents. To determine the relationship between Zn deficiency and the regulation of food intake, we evaluated leptin gene expression in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), and hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (hCRH) and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (hNPY) of rats Zn-deficient only to show reduced food intake and growth rate but not food intake cycling. Growing male Sprague-Dawley rats (240g) were randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups: Zn-adequate (ZA; 30mg/kg diet), Zn-deficient (ZD; 3 mg/kg diet), pair-fed with ZD (PF; 30 1 mg/kg diet) and Zn-sufficient (ZS; 50 mg/kg diet) (n 8), and were fed for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured, as were blood mononuclear cells and pancreas Zn levels. eWAT leptin, hCRH and hNPY mRNA levels were determined. Food intake was decreased by about 10% in ZD and PF rats compared to ZA and ZS rats. Growth and eWAT leptin mRNA levels were unaffected in PF rats but were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in ZD rats. However, hNPY showed a tendency to increase, and hCRH significantly (P<0.05) decreased, in both ZD and PF rats. These results suggest that while leptin gene expression may be directly affected by Zn, hNPY and hCRH are likely responding to reduced food intake caused by Zn deficiency.

    AB - Zn deficiency reduces food intake and growth rate in rodents. To determine the relationship between Zn deficiency and the regulation of food intake, we evaluated leptin gene expression in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), and hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (hCRH) and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (hNPY) of rats Zn-deficient only to show reduced food intake and growth rate but not food intake cycling. Growing male Sprague-Dawley rats (240g) were randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups: Zn-adequate (ZA; 30mg/kg diet), Zn-deficient (ZD; 3 mg/kg diet), pair-fed with ZD (PF; 30 1 mg/kg diet) and Zn-sufficient (ZS; 50 mg/kg diet) (n 8), and were fed for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured, as were blood mononuclear cells and pancreas Zn levels. eWAT leptin, hCRH and hNPY mRNA levels were determined. Food intake was decreased by about 10% in ZD and PF rats compared to ZA and ZS rats. Growth and eWAT leptin mRNA levels were unaffected in PF rats but were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in ZD rats. However, hNPY showed a tendency to increase, and hCRH significantly (P<0.05) decreased, in both ZD and PF rats. These results suggest that while leptin gene expression may be directly affected by Zn, hNPY and hCRH are likely responding to reduced food intake caused by Zn deficiency.

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    KW - corticotrophin-releasing hormone

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    KW - food intake

    KW - growth

    KW - OB gene-expression

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    KW - adipose-tissue

    KW - metabolic-rate

    KW - plasma leptin

    KW - secretion

    KW - insulin

    KW - humans

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