Maternal age specific prevalence of gastroschisis in the North of England over 30 years

Rute Vieira, Nicola Miller, Judith Rankin

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of gastroschisis over the last 30 years in the North of England and its association with maternal age.
DesignRetrospective population‐based study.MethodsData were extracted from the NorCAS, now part of the NCARDRS, for cases delivered between 1986 and 2015. Age‐standardised annual and maternal age group prevalence rates were estimated, the latter using the North of England's maternal age structure in 2013–2015 as reference. Mann‐Kendall trend tests and Sen's slopes were computed to assess the presence of linear time‐trends.
Results445 cases were notified from 999 208 registered livebirths and stillbirths. The total prevalence was 4.5 (95% CI: 4.1, 4.9) per 10 000 births. A significant linear increase in total prevalence during the study period was identified (slope: 0.4; P = 0.004). While gastroschisis has been most prevalent in mothers younger than 25 until around 2007, prevalence among 25–29 and 30–35 year‐old mothers appears to be increasing significantly since then (slope: 2.1; P = 0.007 and slope: 1.0; P = 0.007, respectively), with 25–29 year‐old mothers becoming the group with the highest prevalence of gastroschisis in the 2013–2015 period (<20 years: 5.3; 20–24 years: 16.1; 25–29 years: 19.3; 30–34 years: 9.7; 35–39 years: 1.1).
ConclusionGastroschisis prevalence continues to increase in the North of England and is becoming more common among mothers older than 25, which make up 70% of the maternal population. A better understanding of the risk factors among older mothers could lead to appropriate interventions and help reduce the prevalence of gastroschisis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)PF.046
JournalBJOG-An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume125
Issue numberS2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018
EventBritish Maternal & Fetal Medicine Society (BMFMS) 20th Annual Conference 2018 - Brighton, UK
Duration: 19 Apr 201820 Apr 2018

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Gastroschisis
Maternal Age
England
Mothers
Stillbirth
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parturition

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Maternal age specific prevalence of gastroschisis in the North of England over 30 years. / Vieira, Rute; Miller, Nicola; Rankin, Judith.

In: BJOG-An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 125, No. S2, 04.2018, p. PF.046.

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

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title = "Maternal age specific prevalence of gastroschisis in the North of England over 30 years",
abstract = "ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of gastroschisis over the last 30 years in the North of England and its association with maternal age.DesignRetrospective population‐based study.MethodsData were extracted from the NorCAS, now part of the NCARDRS, for cases delivered between 1986 and 2015. Age‐standardised annual and maternal age group prevalence rates were estimated, the latter using the North of England's maternal age structure in 2013–2015 as reference. Mann‐Kendall trend tests and Sen's slopes were computed to assess the presence of linear time‐trends.Results445 cases were notified from 999 208 registered livebirths and stillbirths. The total prevalence was 4.5 (95{\%} CI: 4.1, 4.9) per 10 000 births. A significant linear increase in total prevalence during the study period was identified (slope: 0.4; P = 0.004). While gastroschisis has been most prevalent in mothers younger than 25 until around 2007, prevalence among 25–29 and 30–35 year‐old mothers appears to be increasing significantly since then (slope: 2.1; P = 0.007 and slope: 1.0; P = 0.007, respectively), with 25–29 year‐old mothers becoming the group with the highest prevalence of gastroschisis in the 2013–2015 period (<20 years: 5.3; 20–24 years: 16.1; 25–29 years: 19.3; 30–34 years: 9.7; 35–39 years: 1.1).ConclusionGastroschisis prevalence continues to increase in the North of England and is becoming more common among mothers older than 25, which make up 70{\%} of the maternal population. A better understanding of the risk factors among older mothers could lead to appropriate interventions and help reduce the prevalence of gastroschisis.",
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T1 - Maternal age specific prevalence of gastroschisis in the North of England over 30 years

AU - Vieira, Rute

AU - Miller, Nicola

AU - Rankin, Judith

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N2 - ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of gastroschisis over the last 30 years in the North of England and its association with maternal age.DesignRetrospective population‐based study.MethodsData were extracted from the NorCAS, now part of the NCARDRS, for cases delivered between 1986 and 2015. Age‐standardised annual and maternal age group prevalence rates were estimated, the latter using the North of England's maternal age structure in 2013–2015 as reference. Mann‐Kendall trend tests and Sen's slopes were computed to assess the presence of linear time‐trends.Results445 cases were notified from 999 208 registered livebirths and stillbirths. The total prevalence was 4.5 (95% CI: 4.1, 4.9) per 10 000 births. A significant linear increase in total prevalence during the study period was identified (slope: 0.4; P = 0.004). While gastroschisis has been most prevalent in mothers younger than 25 until around 2007, prevalence among 25–29 and 30–35 year‐old mothers appears to be increasing significantly since then (slope: 2.1; P = 0.007 and slope: 1.0; P = 0.007, respectively), with 25–29 year‐old mothers becoming the group with the highest prevalence of gastroschisis in the 2013–2015 period (<20 years: 5.3; 20–24 years: 16.1; 25–29 years: 19.3; 30–34 years: 9.7; 35–39 years: 1.1).ConclusionGastroschisis prevalence continues to increase in the North of England and is becoming more common among mothers older than 25, which make up 70% of the maternal population. A better understanding of the risk factors among older mothers could lead to appropriate interventions and help reduce the prevalence of gastroschisis.

AB - ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of gastroschisis over the last 30 years in the North of England and its association with maternal age.DesignRetrospective population‐based study.MethodsData were extracted from the NorCAS, now part of the NCARDRS, for cases delivered between 1986 and 2015. Age‐standardised annual and maternal age group prevalence rates were estimated, the latter using the North of England's maternal age structure in 2013–2015 as reference. Mann‐Kendall trend tests and Sen's slopes were computed to assess the presence of linear time‐trends.Results445 cases were notified from 999 208 registered livebirths and stillbirths. The total prevalence was 4.5 (95% CI: 4.1, 4.9) per 10 000 births. A significant linear increase in total prevalence during the study period was identified (slope: 0.4; P = 0.004). While gastroschisis has been most prevalent in mothers younger than 25 until around 2007, prevalence among 25–29 and 30–35 year‐old mothers appears to be increasing significantly since then (slope: 2.1; P = 0.007 and slope: 1.0; P = 0.007, respectively), with 25–29 year‐old mothers becoming the group with the highest prevalence of gastroschisis in the 2013–2015 period (<20 years: 5.3; 20–24 years: 16.1; 25–29 years: 19.3; 30–34 years: 9.7; 35–39 years: 1.1).ConclusionGastroschisis prevalence continues to increase in the North of England and is becoming more common among mothers older than 25, which make up 70% of the maternal population. A better understanding of the risk factors among older mothers could lead to appropriate interventions and help reduce the prevalence of gastroschisis.

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DO - 10.1111/1471-0528.15189

M3 - Abstract

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SP - PF.046

JO - BJOG-An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

JF - BJOG-An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

SN - 1470-0328

IS - S2

ER -