Measuring medication adherence in asthma

Development of a novel self-report tool

Alexandra L. Dima, Eric van Ganse, Laurent Laforest, Nathalie Texier, Marijn de Bruin, ASTRO-LAB group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: This study presents the development and validation of MIS-A (Medication Intake Survey-Asthma), a new self-report instrument measuring key adherence properties during long-term asthma treatment. Design: Within a longitudinal asthma cohort study in France and the United Kingdom, adult patients and caregivers of children responded to computer-assisted telephone interviews. Main outcome measures: Scores for distinct adherence properties (taking adherence, correct dosing, therapeutic coverage, drug holidays, overuse) and composite measures were computed for several time intervals. We examined distributions, longitudinal variation, associations between adherence scores and concordance with adherence calculated from medication prescribing or dispensing records. Results: Nine hundred and two participants reported on adherence to 4481 medications on 4140 occasions. About 59.47 and 70.36% revealed < 100% taking adherence in the last week and month; 42.76% had a drug holiday of > 1 week in the last 4 months. Adherence varied within patients during the follow-up (intra-class correlation = . 41–.71). Correlations between adherence scores were moderate to strong (ρ = .51–.85, p ≤ .001), except medication overuse (ρ = .04–.19, p ≤.05). Four-month taking adherence was associated with dispensing adherence, but not with prescribing adherence (ρ = .33, p < .001; and .12, p = .26). Conclusion: MIS-A is a promising, easy-to-use self-report tool that can capture accurately different adherence properties over a long time period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1288-1307
Number of pages20
JournalPsychology & Health
Volume32
Issue number10
Early online date20 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Self Report
Asthma
Holidays
Caregivers
France
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • asthma
  • medication adherence
  • self-report
  • CATI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Measuring medication adherence in asthma : Development of a novel self-report tool . / Dima, Alexandra L. ; van Ganse, Eric; Laforest, Laurent ; Texier, Nathalie; de Bruin, Marijn; ASTRO-LAB group.

In: Psychology & Health, Vol. 32, No. 10, 2017, p. 1288-1307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dima, AL, van Ganse, E, Laforest, L, Texier, N, de Bruin, M & ASTRO-LAB group 2017, 'Measuring medication adherence in asthma: Development of a novel self-report tool ', Psychology & Health, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 1288-1307. https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2017.1290248
Dima, Alexandra L. ; van Ganse, Eric ; Laforest, Laurent ; Texier, Nathalie ; de Bruin, Marijn ; ASTRO-LAB group. / Measuring medication adherence in asthma : Development of a novel self-report tool . In: Psychology & Health. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 10. pp. 1288-1307.
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AB - Objective: This study presents the development and validation of MIS-A (Medication Intake Survey-Asthma), a new self-report instrument measuring key adherence properties during long-term asthma treatment. Design: Within a longitudinal asthma cohort study in France and the United Kingdom, adult patients and caregivers of children responded to computer-assisted telephone interviews. Main outcome measures: Scores for distinct adherence properties (taking adherence, correct dosing, therapeutic coverage, drug holidays, overuse) and composite measures were computed for several time intervals. We examined distributions, longitudinal variation, associations between adherence scores and concordance with adherence calculated from medication prescribing or dispensing records. Results: Nine hundred and two participants reported on adherence to 4481 medications on 4140 occasions. About 59.47 and 70.36% revealed < 100% taking adherence in the last week and month; 42.76% had a drug holiday of > 1 week in the last 4 months. Adherence varied within patients during the follow-up (intra-class correlation = . 41–.71). Correlations between adherence scores were moderate to strong (ρ = .51–.85, p ≤ .001), except medication overuse (ρ = .04–.19, p ≤.05). Four-month taking adherence was associated with dispensing adherence, but not with prescribing adherence (ρ = .33, p < .001; and .12, p = .26). Conclusion: MIS-A is a promising, easy-to-use self-report tool that can capture accurately different adherence properties over a long time period.

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