Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features

R Flin, K Mearns, P O'Connor, R Bryden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

775 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In UK industry, particularly in the energy sector, there has been a movement away from 'lagging' measures of safety based on retrospective data, such as lost time accidents and incidents. towards 'leading' or predictive assessments of the safety climate of the organisation or worksite. A number of different instruments have been developed by industrial psychologists for this purpose, resulting in a proliferation of scales with distinct developmental histories. Reviewing the methods and results from a sample of industrial surveys, the thematic basis of Is scales used to assess safety climate is examined. This suggests that the most typically assessed dimensions relate to management (72% of studies), the safety system (67%), and risk (67%), in addition themes relating to work pressure and competence appear in a third of the studies. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-192
Number of pages16
JournalSafety Science
Volume34
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • safety climate
  • risk
  • management
  • OFFSHORE PETROLEUM PLATFORMS
  • EMPLOYEE ATTITUDES
  • CULTURE
  • PERCEPTIONS
  • ACCIDENTS
  • BEHAVIOR
  • RISK

Cite this

Flin, R., Mearns, K., O'Connor, P., & Bryden, R. (2000). Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features. Safety Science, 34, 177-192.

Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features. / Flin, R ; Mearns, K ; O'Connor, P ; Bryden, R .

In: Safety Science, Vol. 34, 2000, p. 177-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flin, R, Mearns, K, O'Connor, P & Bryden, R 2000, 'Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features' Safety Science, vol. 34, pp. 177-192.
Flin R, Mearns K, O'Connor P, Bryden R. Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features. Safety Science. 2000;34:177-192.
Flin, R ; Mearns, K ; O'Connor, P ; Bryden, R . / Measuring safety climate: identifying the common features. In: Safety Science. 2000 ; Vol. 34. pp. 177-192.
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