Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction

Stefania Spanò

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever, a life-threatening bacterial infection that is very common in the developing world. Recent spread of antimicrobial resistant isolates of S. Typhi makes typhoid fever, a global public health risk. Despite being a common disease, still very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying typhoid fever and S. Typhi pathogenesis. In contrast to other Salmonellae, S. Typhi can only infect humans. The molecular bases of this human restriction are mostly unknown. Recent studies identified a novel pathway that contributes to S. Typhi human restriction and is required for killing S. Typhi in macrophages of nonsusceptible species. The small Rab GTPase Rab32 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are the critical components of this pathway. These proteins were already well known as important regulators of intracellular membrane transport. In particular, they are central for the transport of enzymes that synthetize melanin in pigment cells. The recent findings that Rab32 and BLOC-3 are required for S. Typhi host restriction point out to a novel mechanism restricting the growth of bacterial pathogen, dependent on the transport of still unknown molecule(s) to the S. Typhi vacuole. The identification of this novel antimicrobial pathway constitutes a critical starting point to study molecular mechanisms killing bacterial pathogens and possibly identify novel antimicrobial molecules.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiophysics of Infection
EditorsMark C. Leake
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages283-294
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-32189-9
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-32187-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2016

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Volume915
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Salmonella typhi
Typhoid Fever
rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors
Intracellular Membranes
Critical Pathways
Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Melanins
Vacuoles
Serogroup
Bacterial Infections
Public Health
Macrophages
Enzymes
Growth

Keywords

  • Salmonella Typhi
  • Typhoid fever
  • Rab GTPases
  • Hermansky– Pudlak syndrome
  • Lysosome-related organelles
  • Host–pathogen interaction

Cite this

Spanò, S. (2016). Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction. In M. C. Leake (Ed.), Biophysics of Infection (pp. 283-294). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 915). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32189-9_17

Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction. / Spanò, Stefania.

Biophysics of Infection. ed. / Mark C. Leake. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 283-294 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 915).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Spanò, S 2016, Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction. in MC Leake (ed.), Biophysics of Infection. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 915, Springer International Publishing, pp. 283-294. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32189-9_17
Spanò S. Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction. In Leake MC, editor, Biophysics of Infection. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 283-294. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32189-9_17
Spanò, Stefania. / Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction. Biophysics of Infection. editor / Mark C. Leake. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 283-294 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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