Mechanotransduction in the muscle spindle

Guy S. Bewick, Robert W. Banks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The focus of this review is on the principal sensory ending of the mammalian muscle spindle, known as the primary ending. The process of mechanosensory transduction in the primary ending is examined under five headings: (i) action potential responses to defined mechanical stimuli—representing the ending's input–output properties; (ii) the receptor potential—including the currents giving rise to it; (iii) sensory-terminal deformation—measurable changes in the shape of the primary-ending terminals correlated with intrafusal sarcomere length, and what may cause them; (iv) putative stretch-sensitive channels—pharmacological and immunocytochemical clues to their identity; and (v) synaptic-like vesicles—the physiology and pharmacology of an intrinsic glutamatergic system in the primary and other mechanosensory endings, with some thoughts on the possible role of the system. Thus, the review highlights spindle stretch-evoked output is the product of multi-ionic receptor currents plus complex and sophisticated regulatory gain controls, both positive and negative in nature, as befits its status as the most complex sensory organ after the special senses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-190
Number of pages16
JournalPflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology
Volume467
Issue number1
Early online date3 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

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Cellular Mechanotransduction
Muscle Spindles
Sarcomeres
Action Potentials
Muscle
Pharmacology
Gain control
Physiology

Keywords

  • muscle spindle
  • mechanotransduction
  • DEG/ENaC
  • PLD-mGluR
  • synaptic-like vesicle
  • mechanosensation

Cite this

Mechanotransduction in the muscle spindle. / Bewick, Guy S.; Banks, Robert W.

In: Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology, Vol. 467, No. 1, 01.2015, p. 175-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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