Mediators and effect modifiers of the causal pathway between child exposure to domestic violence and internalising behaviours among children and adolescents: A systematic review of the literature

Bethan Carter, Shantini Paranjothy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Exposure to domestic violence (DV) during childhood is a global public health concern. DV is defined as “Any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality.”(Home Office, 2013). Within this review, DV and intimate partner violence (IPV) are considered synonymous and they are used interchangeably to coincide with the terminology used within individual publications. Exposure to DV is regarded as a form of child maltreatment (Gilbert et al., 2009) and children exposed to DV experience similar rates of internalising and externalising problems as those directly abused (Moylan et al., 2010). In the UK and the USA, approximately 20% - 25% of children witness DV during childhood and adolescence (Finkelhor, Turner, Shattuck, & Hamby, 2015; Radford, 2011). The costs of child exposure to DV are significant and the support of these children have been estimated to cost UK taxpayers £1.4 billion in education, health care, residential and crime costs (Pro Bono Economics, 2018). In the USA, the lifetime economic burden estimated to be $70,000 per victim (Holmes, Richter, Votruba, Berg, & Bender, 2018).
Original languageEnglish
JournalTrauma, Violence and Abuse
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 21 Sep 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mediators and effect modifiers of the causal pathway between child exposure to domestic violence and internalising behaviours among children and adolescents: A systematic review of the literature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this