Medicating the Soul

Why Medication Needs Stories

John Swinton* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores and develops a theological perspective on taking and receiving medication. It argues that the task of prescribing and administering psychopharmaceutical drugs is a thoroughly theological enterprise and should be looked at and practiced accordingly. The paper presents a theological anthropology that opens up space for rethinking the role of medication not only in relation to therapeutic intervention, but in relation to the chief end of human beings: to glorify God and live with God forever Drawing on theology and the narratives of people living with mental health challenges, the paper seeks to facilitate a movement from neurons to souls: a movement that realigns the goals of prescribing and opens up space to rethink the nature of "symptoms" and the ultimate intentions of the psychopharmacological enterprise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-318
Number of pages17
JournalChristian bioethics
Volume24
Issue number3
Early online date26 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Keywords

  • pharmacological healing
  • pharmacomania
  • psychotropic medication
  • severe mental health challenges
  • soul
  • symptoms
  • theological anthropology

Cite this

Medicating the Soul : Why Medication Needs Stories. / Swinton, John (Corresponding Author).

In: Christian bioethics, Vol. 24, No. 3, 12.2018, p. 302-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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