Memory for non-native language

the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form

Cristina Sampaio, Agnieszka E. Konopka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., “The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye”). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-544
Number of pages8
JournalMemory
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Language
Word Processing
Linguistics
Automatic Data Processing
Population Groups
Retention (Psychology)
Surface Form
Lexical Processing
Research
Non-native Speakers

Keywords

  • memory for language
  • bilingualism
  • reconstructive memory

Cite this

Memory for non-native language : the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form. / Sampaio, Cristina; Konopka, Agnieszka E.

In: Memory , Vol. 21, No. 4, 2013, p. 537-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2ba7342803064d14a6c051874a3a19a4,
title = "Memory for non-native language: the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form",
abstract = "Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., “The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye”). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.",
keywords = "memory for language, bilingualism, reconstructive memory",
author = "Cristina Sampaio and Konopka, {Agnieszka E.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/09658211.2012.746371",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "537--544",
journal = "Memory",
issn = "0965-8211",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Memory for non-native language

T2 - the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form

AU - Sampaio, Cristina

AU - Konopka, Agnieszka E.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., “The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye”). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.

AB - Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., “The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye”). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.

KW - memory for language

KW - bilingualism

KW - reconstructive memory

U2 - 10.1080/09658211.2012.746371

DO - 10.1080/09658211.2012.746371

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 537

EP - 544

JO - Memory

JF - Memory

SN - 0965-8211

IS - 4

ER -