Memory in Fungal Pathogens Promotes Immune Evasion, Colonisation, and Infection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

By analogy with Pavlov’s dogs, certain pathogens have evolved anticipatory behaviours that exploit specific signals in the human host to prepare themselves against imminent host challenges. This adaptive prediction, a type of history-dependent microbial behaviour, represents a primitive form of microbial memory. For fungal pathogens, adaptive prediction helps them circumvent nutritional immunity, protects them against phagocytic killing, and activates immune evasion strategies. We describe how these anticipatory responses, and the contrasting lifestyles and evolutionary trajectories of fungal pathogens, have influenced the evolution of such adaptive behaviours, and how these behaviours affect host colonisation and infection.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-230
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Microbiology
Volume27
Issue number3
Early online date30 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

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Immune Evasion
Infection
Psychological Adaptation
Life Style
Immunity
History
Dogs

Keywords

  • fungal pathogenicity
  • immune evasion
  • fungal infection
  • fungal adaptation
  • adaptive prediction
  • fungal memory
  • COMPLEMENT EVASION
  • ASPERGILLUS-FUMIGATUS
  • STRESS-RESPONSE
  • VIRULENCE
  • ADAPTIVE PREDICTION
  • ENVIRONMENTAL-CHANGES
  • BETA-GLUCAN RECEPTOR
  • CANDIDA-ALBICANS
  • HYPHAL GROWTH
  • TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Memory in Fungal Pathogens Promotes Immune Evasion, Colonisation, and Infection",
abstract = "By analogy with Pavlov’s dogs, certain pathogens have evolved anticipatory behaviours that exploit specific signals in the human host to prepare themselves against imminent host challenges. This adaptive prediction, a type of history-dependent microbial behaviour, represents a primitive form of microbial memory. For fungal pathogens, adaptive prediction helps them circumvent nutritional immunity, protects them against phagocytic killing, and activates immune evasion strategies. We describe how these anticipatory responses, and the contrasting lifestyles and evolutionary trajectories of fungal pathogens, have influenced the evolution of such adaptive behaviours, and how these behaviours affect host colonisation and infection.",
keywords = "fungal pathogenicity, immune evasion, fungal infection, fungal adaptation, adaptive prediction, fungal memory, COMPLEMENT EVASION, ASPERGILLUS-FUMIGATUS, STRESS-RESPONSE, VIRULENCE, ADAPTIVE PREDICTION, ENVIRONMENTAL-CHANGES, BETA-GLUCAN RECEPTOR, CANDIDA-ALBICANS, HYPHAL GROWTH, TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE",
author = "Brown, {Alistair J. P.} and Gow, {Neil A. R.} and Adilia Warris and Brown, {Gordon D.}",
note = "We are grateful to our colleagues in the medical mycology and fungal immunology communities for many stimulating and enjoyable discussions. We also thank Wai-Lum Sung for his help with the figures. The authors are directors of the Medical Research Council Centre for Medical Mycology at the University of Aberdeen led by GDB (MR/N006364/1). They are also funded by a Strategic Award from the Wellcome Trust [www.wellcome.ac.uk] led by NARG (097377). AJPB and NARG are funded by a programme grant from the UK Medical Research Council [www.mrc.ac.uk] (MR/M026663/1). NARG and GDB are supported by Wellcome Trust Investigator Awards (099215, 102705). NARG has additional awards from the Wellcome Trust (075470, 080088, 086827). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.",
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