Mental representations of familiar faces

A. Mike Burton, Rob Jenkins, Stefan R. Schweinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Bruce and Young (1986) framework makes a number of important distinctions between the types of representation needed to recognize a familiar face. Here, we return to these, focussing particularly on face recognition units. We argue that such representations need to incorporate idiosyncratic within-person variability, asking questions such as 'What counts as a picture of Harrison Ford?'. We describe a mechanism for achieving this, and discuss the relation between image variability and episodic face memories, in the context of behavioural and neurophysiological data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)943-958
Number of pages16
JournalBritish Journal of Psychology
Volume102
Issue number4
Early online date14 Jun 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • event-related potentials
  • person recognition
  • brain potentials
  • unfamiliar faces
  • geometric distortions
  • stimulus repetitions
  • processing stages
  • name recognition
  • neural system
  • perception

Cite this

Burton, A. M., Jenkins, R., & Schweinberger, S. R. (2011). Mental representations of familiar faces. British Journal of Psychology, 102(4), 943-958. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8295.2011.02039.x

Mental representations of familiar faces. / Burton, A. Mike; Jenkins, Rob; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

In: British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 102, No. 4, 11.2011, p. 943-958.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burton, AM, Jenkins, R & Schweinberger, SR 2011, 'Mental representations of familiar faces', British Journal of Psychology, vol. 102, no. 4, pp. 943-958. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8295.2011.02039.x
Burton, A. Mike ; Jenkins, Rob ; Schweinberger, Stefan R. / Mental representations of familiar faces. In: British Journal of Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 102, No. 4. pp. 943-958.
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