Metabolic and structural skeletal muscle health in systemic lupus erythematosus related fatigue

a multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging study

Sai Man Cheung, Karen Keenan, Nicholas Senn, Gayle Hutcheon, Kwoshing Chan, Lars Erwig, Andrew Schrepf, Paula Dospinescu, Stuart Gray, Gordon Waiter, Jiabo He, Neil Basu (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential structural and metabolic role of skeletal muscle in SLE related fatigue. Methods: A case control, multi-modal MRI study was conducted. Cases were inactive SLE patients who reported chronic fatigue. Controls were age/sex matched healthy members of the general population. Participants were clinically characterised and then underwent a 3T whole body MRI scan. Resting and dynamic 31 Phosphorous Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of the calf muscles was applied from which phosphocreatine recovery half time (PCr), a marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, was computed. In addition, microstructural sequences (T1-weighted anatomical images, T2 mapping and diffusion tensor imaging) were acquired. Descriptive statistics evaluated group differences and within case physical fatigue correlations were explored. Results: Of the 37 recruits (mean age= 43.8 years, 89.2% female), cases (n=19) reported higher levels of physical fatigue, pain, depression and sleep disturbance compared to the control group (p<0.0001). PCr was greater (p=0.045) among cases (33.0+/-9.0s) compared to controls (27.1+/-6.6s). No micro-structural group differences were observed. Within cases, physical fatigue did not correlate with PCr (r=-0.28, p=0.25). Conclusion: We report preliminary data evidencing greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction among fatigued SLE patients compared to healthy controls.
Original languageEnglish
JournalArthritis Care & Research
Early online date10 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Jan 2019

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Fatigue
Skeletal Muscle
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Health
Whole Body Imaging
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Phosphocreatine
Sleep
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Depression
Pain
Muscles
Control Groups
Population

Keywords

  • systemic lupus erythematosus
  • fatigue
  • skeletal muscle

Cite this

Metabolic and structural skeletal muscle health in systemic lupus erythematosus related fatigue : a multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging study. / Cheung, Sai Man; Keenan, Karen; Senn, Nicholas; Hutcheon, Gayle; Chan, Kwoshing; Erwig, Lars; Schrepf, Andrew; Dospinescu, Paula; Gray, Stuart; Waiter, Gordon; He, Jiabo; Basu, Neil (Corresponding Author).

In: Arthritis Care & Research, 10.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential structural and metabolic role of skeletal muscle in SLE related fatigue. Methods: A case control, multi-modal MRI study was conducted. Cases were inactive SLE patients who reported chronic fatigue. Controls were age/sex matched healthy members of the general population. Participants were clinically characterised and then underwent a 3T whole body MRI scan. Resting and dynamic 31 Phosphorous Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of the calf muscles was applied from which phosphocreatine recovery half time (PCr), a marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, was computed. In addition, microstructural sequences (T1-weighted anatomical images, T2 mapping and diffusion tensor imaging) were acquired. Descriptive statistics evaluated group differences and within case physical fatigue correlations were explored. Results: Of the 37 recruits (mean age= 43.8 years, 89.2{\%} female), cases (n=19) reported higher levels of physical fatigue, pain, depression and sleep disturbance compared to the control group (p<0.0001). PCr was greater (p=0.045) among cases (33.0+/-9.0s) compared to controls (27.1+/-6.6s). No micro-structural group differences were observed. Within cases, physical fatigue did not correlate with PCr (r=-0.28, p=0.25). Conclusion: We report preliminary data evidencing greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction among fatigued SLE patients compared to healthy controls.",
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AU - Cheung, Sai Man

AU - Keenan, Karen

AU - Senn, Nicholas

AU - Hutcheon, Gayle

AU - Chan, Kwoshing

AU - Erwig, Lars

AU - Schrepf, Andrew

AU - Dospinescu, Paula

AU - Gray, Stuart

AU - Waiter, Gordon

AU - He, Jiabo

AU - Basu, Neil

N1 - Funding: This work was supported by Lupus UK Acknowledgements. Special thanks to the patient community who participated in this research effort.

PY - 2019/1/10

Y1 - 2019/1/10

N2 - Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential structural and metabolic role of skeletal muscle in SLE related fatigue. Methods: A case control, multi-modal MRI study was conducted. Cases were inactive SLE patients who reported chronic fatigue. Controls were age/sex matched healthy members of the general population. Participants were clinically characterised and then underwent a 3T whole body MRI scan. Resting and dynamic 31 Phosphorous Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of the calf muscles was applied from which phosphocreatine recovery half time (PCr), a marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, was computed. In addition, microstructural sequences (T1-weighted anatomical images, T2 mapping and diffusion tensor imaging) were acquired. Descriptive statistics evaluated group differences and within case physical fatigue correlations were explored. Results: Of the 37 recruits (mean age= 43.8 years, 89.2% female), cases (n=19) reported higher levels of physical fatigue, pain, depression and sleep disturbance compared to the control group (p<0.0001). PCr was greater (p=0.045) among cases (33.0+/-9.0s) compared to controls (27.1+/-6.6s). No micro-structural group differences were observed. Within cases, physical fatigue did not correlate with PCr (r=-0.28, p=0.25). Conclusion: We report preliminary data evidencing greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction among fatigued SLE patients compared to healthy controls.

AB - Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential structural and metabolic role of skeletal muscle in SLE related fatigue. Methods: A case control, multi-modal MRI study was conducted. Cases were inactive SLE patients who reported chronic fatigue. Controls were age/sex matched healthy members of the general population. Participants were clinically characterised and then underwent a 3T whole body MRI scan. Resting and dynamic 31 Phosphorous Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of the calf muscles was applied from which phosphocreatine recovery half time (PCr), a marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, was computed. In addition, microstructural sequences (T1-weighted anatomical images, T2 mapping and diffusion tensor imaging) were acquired. Descriptive statistics evaluated group differences and within case physical fatigue correlations were explored. Results: Of the 37 recruits (mean age= 43.8 years, 89.2% female), cases (n=19) reported higher levels of physical fatigue, pain, depression and sleep disturbance compared to the control group (p<0.0001). PCr was greater (p=0.045) among cases (33.0+/-9.0s) compared to controls (27.1+/-6.6s). No micro-structural group differences were observed. Within cases, physical fatigue did not correlate with PCr (r=-0.28, p=0.25). Conclusion: We report preliminary data evidencing greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction among fatigued SLE patients compared to healthy controls.

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