Metacognition in forensic patients with schizophrenia and a past history of interpersonal violence: an exploratory study

L. J. Mitchell, A. Gumley, E. S. Reilly, A. Macbeth, P. Lysaker, A. Carcione, G. Dimaggio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metacognition has been shown to be impaired in people diagnosed with schizophrenia, and related to poorer social functioning. To date, no research has looked at the relationship between a particularly rare - but problematic - social functioning outcome (violence) and metacognition. The present study explored patterns of metacognition in people diagnosed with schizophrenia and a history of interpersonal violence, and comparing them to a group with schizophrenia and no history of violence. Participants took part in an interview which explored stress and coping, which was subsequently coded for metacognitive ability. There were no differences between the two groups. Metacognition was significantly correlated with negative symptoms. The limitations of the study and implications for clinical practice are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-51
Number of pages10
JournalPsychosis
Volume4
Issue number1
Early online date31 Oct 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • metacognition
  • schizophrenia
  • violence

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