Method fragments

G Rugg, P McGeorge, N Maiden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The traditional unit of analysis in knowledge acquisition and requirements acquisition is the method, e.g. the interview, the repertory grid etc. There are practical and theoretical difficulties with this division. A more useful concept is the method fragment, described in this paper. The method fragment is a discrete component of a method which can be used in one or more methods. The discreteness of method fragments makes it much easier to describe their strengths and weaknesses than is the case with methods, enabling the elicitor to put together a customized method to suit a particular elicitation need. In this paper Mle outline the concept of method fragments using worked examples, discuss issues raised and make recommendations for further work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-257
Number of pages10
JournalExpert Systems
Volume17
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • questioning methodology
  • knowledge acquisition
  • elicitation
  • card sorts
  • scenarios
  • MEMORY

Cite this

Rugg, G., McGeorge, P., & Maiden, N. (2000). Method fragments. Expert Systems, 17, 248-257.

Method fragments. / Rugg, G ; McGeorge, P ; Maiden, N .

In: Expert Systems, Vol. 17, 2000, p. 248-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rugg, G, McGeorge, P & Maiden, N 2000, 'Method fragments', Expert Systems, vol. 17, pp. 248-257.
Rugg G, McGeorge P, Maiden N. Method fragments. Expert Systems. 2000;17:248-257.
Rugg, G ; McGeorge, P ; Maiden, N . / Method fragments. In: Expert Systems. 2000 ; Vol. 17. pp. 248-257.
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