Microbial sulphate reduction during Neoproterozoic glaciation, Port Askaig Formation, UK

John Parnell, Adrian J. Boyce

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3 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The Neoproterozoic Port Askaig Formation contains widespread pyrite within many diamictite beds, across Scotland and Ireland. The quantity of pyrite is anomalous for coarse-grained rocks, especially in rocks deposited at a time when seawater contained low sulphate levels due to a continental ice cover which inhibited weathering. Sulphur isotope compositions evolve from lightest values (down to -3.1‰) at the base of the formation to highly positive compositions in the overlying Bonahaven Dolomite (mean +44.8‰). This trend is consistent with progressive utilization of available sulphate by closed system microbial sulphate reduction. Together with records from other contemporary diamictite successions, there emerges a picture of global microbial activity during Neoproterozoic ‘Snowball Earth’ glaciation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)850-854
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Geological Society
Volume174
Early online date15 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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glaciation
diamictite
sulfate
pyrite
sulfur isotope
ice cover
rock
microbial activity
dolomite
weathering
seawater
trend

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Microbial sulphate reduction during Neoproterozoic glaciation, Port Askaig Formation, UK. / Parnell, John; Boyce, Adrian J.

In: Journal of the Geological Society , Vol. 174, 2017, p. 850-854.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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