Mineralogical and Microstructural Change Accompanying the Interaction of Boom Clay with Ordinary Portland Cement

David Read, Fredrik Paul Glasser, C. Ayora, M. T. Guardiola, A. Sneyers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The results of in situ tests conducted at the HADES underground laboratory, Mol, Belgium, indicate significant reaction between Boom Clay and ordinary Portland cement over a period of 18 months. Mass transfer of calcium, magnesium, aluminium, iron, silicon and sulphur leads to the development of a distinct zonal structure extending 100-250 mum into both the cement and the clay. The associated mineralogical changes have modified the microstructure of the altered region and there is clear evidence of increased porosity, in the zone of portlandite dissolution. Additionally, experiments conducted at 85 degreesC show the presence of a narrow Mg-Al-Si rich band in the clay close to the contact. Analyses indicate the formation of a di-phasic (Mg-aluminate hydroxide and Mg-silicate hydroxide) gel with low crystallinity and compositions close to hydrotalcite and sepiolite, respectively. Reactive transport modelling has been used to simulate phase transformations within the active region and relate these to porosity changes based on simple molar volume considerations. Given the close coupling of mineral chemistry and microstructure in cement-clay systems, such an approach is regarded as essential if reliable estimates are to be made of long-term reactivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Cement Research
Volume4
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • PRECIPITATION KINETICS
  • DISSOLUTION KINETICS
  • REACTIVE TRANSPORT
  • 25-DEGREES-C
  • 80-DEGREES-C
  • KAOLINITE
  • SYSTEM
  • MODEL
  • STATE

Cite this

Mineralogical and Microstructural Change Accompanying the Interaction of Boom Clay with Ordinary Portland Cement. / Read, David; Glasser, Fredrik Paul; Ayora, C.; Guardiola, M. T.; Sneyers, A.

In: Advances in Cement Research, Vol. 4, No. 13, 2001, p. 175-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Read, David ; Glasser, Fredrik Paul ; Ayora, C. ; Guardiola, M. T. ; Sneyers, A. / Mineralogical and Microstructural Change Accompanying the Interaction of Boom Clay with Ordinary Portland Cement. In: Advances in Cement Research. 2001 ; Vol. 4, No. 13. pp. 175-183.
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