Models of care for chronic kidney disease

a systematic review

Ruairidh Nicoll, Lynn Robertson, Elliot Gemmell, Pawana Sharma, Corrinda Black, Angharad Marks (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and presents an increasing burden to patients and health services. However, the optimal model of care for patients with CKD is unclear. We systematically reviewed the clinical effectiveness of different models of care for the management of CKD. A comprehensive search of eight databases was undertaken for articles published from 1992 to 2016. We included randomised controlled trials which assessed any model of care in the management of adults with pre-dialysis CKD, reporting renal, cardiovascular, mortality and other outcomes. Data extraction and quality assessment was carried out independently by two authors. Results were summarized narratively. Nine articles (seven studies) were included. Four models of care were identified: nurse-led, multidisciplinary specialist team, pharmacist-led and self-management. Nurse and pharmacist-led care reported improved rates of prescribing of drugs relevant to CKD. Heterogeneity was high between studies and all studies were at high risk of bias. Nurse-led care and multidisciplinary specialist care were associated with small improvements in blood pressure control. Evidence of long term improvements in renal, cardiovascular or mortality endpoints was limited by short follow up. We found little published evidence about the effectiveness of different models of care to guide best practice for service design, although there was some evidence that models of care where health professionals deliver care according to a structured protocol or guideline may improve adherence to treatment targets. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-396
Number of pages8
JournalNephrology
Volume23
Issue number5
Early online date21 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Nurses
Pharmacists
Kidney
Drug Prescriptions
Mortality
Self Care
Nuclear Family
Practice Guidelines
Health Services
Dialysis
Patient Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Databases
Guidelines
Blood Pressure
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • chronic kidney disease
  • model of care
  • systematic review

Cite this

Models of care for chronic kidney disease : a systematic review. / Nicoll, Ruairidh; Robertson, Lynn; Gemmell, Elliot ; Sharma, Pawana; Black, Corrinda; Marks, Angharad (Corresponding Author).

In: Nephrology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 389-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicoll, Ruairidh ; Robertson, Lynn ; Gemmell, Elliot ; Sharma, Pawana ; Black, Corrinda ; Marks, Angharad. / Models of care for chronic kidney disease : a systematic review. In: Nephrology. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 389-396.
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