Modest Association of Joint Hypermobility With Disabling and Limiting Musculoskeletal Pain: Results From a Large-Scale General Population–Based Survey

Matthew R Mulvey, Gary J Macfarlane, Marcus Beasley, Deborah P.M. Symmons, Karina Lovell, Philip Keeley, Steve Woby, John McBeth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the population prevalence of joint hypermobility (JH) and to test the hypothesis that JH would be associated with reporting musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional population survey in Aberdeen city and Cheshire. 45949 questionnaires were mailed which assessed JH and the presence, distribution, duration and severity of musculoskeletal pain. Based on their pain reports, participants were classified as having chronic widespread pain (CWP), some pain, or no pain. Multinominal logistic regression tested the relationship between JH and pain status. Associations were adjusted for age, sex and other putative confounders. Participants with no pain were the referent category. Results are presented as relative risk ratios (RRR), 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: 12,853 (29.3%) participants returned a questionnaire with complete data. 2,354 (18.3%) participants were classified as hypermobile. 2,094 participants (16.3%) had CWP and 5,801 (45.1%) had some pain and 4,958 participants (38.6%) reported no pain. JH participants were significantly more likely to report CWP than non-JH participants (18.5% vs. 15.8%, p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1325-1333
Number of pages9
JournalArthritis Care & Research
Volume65
Issue number8
Early online date26 Jul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

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Joint Instability
Musculoskeletal Pain
Pain
Chronic Pain
Arthralgia
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

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Modest Association of Joint Hypermobility With Disabling and Limiting Musculoskeletal Pain : Results From a Large-Scale General Population–Based Survey. / Mulvey, Matthew R; Macfarlane, Gary J; Beasley, Marcus; Symmons, Deborah P.M.; Lovell, Karina; Keeley, Philip; Woby, Steve; McBeth, John.

In: Arthritis Care & Research, Vol. 65, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 1325-1333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mulvey, Matthew R ; Macfarlane, Gary J ; Beasley, Marcus ; Symmons, Deborah P.M. ; Lovell, Karina ; Keeley, Philip ; Woby, Steve ; McBeth, John. / Modest Association of Joint Hypermobility With Disabling and Limiting Musculoskeletal Pain : Results From a Large-Scale General Population–Based Survey. In: Arthritis Care & Research. 2013 ; Vol. 65, No. 8. pp. 1325-1333.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the population prevalence of joint hypermobility (JH) and to test the hypothesis that JH would be associated with reporting musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional population survey in Aberdeen city and Cheshire. 45949 questionnaires were mailed which assessed JH and the presence, distribution, duration and severity of musculoskeletal pain. Based on their pain reports, participants were classified as having chronic widespread pain (CWP), some pain, or no pain. Multinominal logistic regression tested the relationship between JH and pain status. Associations were adjusted for age, sex and other putative confounders. Participants with no pain were the referent category. Results are presented as relative risk ratios (RRR), 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: 12,853 (29.3{\%}) participants returned a questionnaire with complete data. 2,354 (18.3{\%}) participants were classified as hypermobile. 2,094 participants (16.3{\%}) had CWP and 5,801 (45.1{\%}) had some pain and 4,958 participants (38.6{\%}) reported no pain. JH participants were significantly more likely to report CWP than non-JH participants (18.5{\%} vs. 15.8{\%}, p",
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