MOLECULAR-GENETICS OF OBLIGATE ANAEROBES FROM THE RUMEN

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rumen is inhabited by a highly specialised microflora consisting of obligately anaerobic bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Rumen bacteria belong to many different phylogenetic groupings and many species exhibit a high degree of rRNA gene sequence diversity, whereas the rumen fungi are monophyletic. At least 21 genes concerned with the degradation and utilisation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, from five species of rumen bacteria and from rumen fungi, have been isolated and sequenced. In general, the catalytic domains of the encoded enzymes belong to enzyme families identified among non-rumen microorganisms, but some show unusual organisation, consisting of multiple catalytic domains. Several bacterial species have been used as recipients for gene transfer by electrotransformation or by conjugation, allowing development of methods for genetic analysis. The rumen is also considered as a potential site for natural gene transfer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-267
Number of pages9
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume121
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 1994

Keywords

  • RUMEN
  • PLANT CELL WALL DEGRADATION
  • ANAEROBE
  • GENE TRANSFER
  • GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE
  • BACTEROIDES-RUMINICOLA
  • CATALYTIC DOMAINS
  • BUTYRIVIBRIO-FIBRISOLVENS
  • STREPTOCOCCUS-BOVIS
  • CONJUGAL TRANSFER
  • RUMINAL BACTERIA
  • SHUTTLE VECTOR
  • XYLANASE
  • SEQUENCE
  • ELECTROPORATION

Cite this

MOLECULAR-GENETICS OF OBLIGATE ANAEROBES FROM THE RUMEN. / FLINT, H J .

In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 121, No. 3, 01.09.1994, p. 259-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

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abstract = "The rumen is inhabited by a highly specialised microflora consisting of obligately anaerobic bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Rumen bacteria belong to many different phylogenetic groupings and many species exhibit a high degree of rRNA gene sequence diversity, whereas the rumen fungi are monophyletic. At least 21 genes concerned with the degradation and utilisation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, from five species of rumen bacteria and from rumen fungi, have been isolated and sequenced. In general, the catalytic domains of the encoded enzymes belong to enzyme families identified among non-rumen microorganisms, but some show unusual organisation, consisting of multiple catalytic domains. Several bacterial species have been used as recipients for gene transfer by electrotransformation or by conjugation, allowing development of methods for genetic analysis. The rumen is also considered as a potential site for natural gene transfer.",
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AB - The rumen is inhabited by a highly specialised microflora consisting of obligately anaerobic bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Rumen bacteria belong to many different phylogenetic groupings and many species exhibit a high degree of rRNA gene sequence diversity, whereas the rumen fungi are monophyletic. At least 21 genes concerned with the degradation and utilisation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, from five species of rumen bacteria and from rumen fungi, have been isolated and sequenced. In general, the catalytic domains of the encoded enzymes belong to enzyme families identified among non-rumen microorganisms, but some show unusual organisation, consisting of multiple catalytic domains. Several bacterial species have been used as recipients for gene transfer by electrotransformation or by conjugation, allowing development of methods for genetic analysis. The rumen is also considered as a potential site for natural gene transfer.

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KW - BACTEROIDES-RUMINICOLA

KW - CATALYTIC DOMAINS

KW - BUTYRIVIBRIO-FIBRISOLVENS

KW - STREPTOCOCCUS-BOVIS

KW - CONJUGAL TRANSFER

KW - RUMINAL BACTERIA

KW - SHUTTLE VECTOR

KW - XYLANASE

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KW - ELECTROPORATION

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