Monitoring asthma in childhood

Management-related issues

ERS Task Force Monitoring Asthma in Children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Management-related issues are an important aspect of monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice. This review summarises the literature on practical aspects of monitoring including adherence to treatment, inhalation technique, ongoing exposure to allergens and irritants, comorbid conditions and side-effects of treatment, as agreed by the European Respiratory Society Task Force on Monitoring Asthma in Childhood. The evidence indicates that it is important to discuss adherence to treatment in a non-confrontational way at every clinic visit, and take into account a patient’s illness and medication beliefs. All task force members teach inhalation techniques at least twice when introducing a new inhalation device and then at least annually. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, combustion-derived air pollutants, house dust mites, fungal spores, pollens and pet dander deserve regular attention during follow-up according to most task force members. In addition, allergic rhinitis should be considered as a cause for poor asthma control. Task force members do not screen for gastro-oesophageal reflux and food allergy. Height and weight are generally measured at least annually to identify individuals who are susceptible to adrenal suppression and to calculate body mass index, even though causality between obesity and asthma has not been established. In cases of poor asthma control, before stepping up treatment the above aspects of monitoring deserve closer attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-203
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean respiratory review : an official journal of the European Respiratory Society
Volume24
Issue number136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015

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Advisory Committees
Asthma
Inhalation
Dander
Pyroglyphidae
Air Pollutants
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Fungal Spores
Food Hypersensitivity
Irritants
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Pets
Therapeutics
Ambulatory Care
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Pollen
Causality
Allergens
Tobacco
Body Mass Index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Monitoring asthma in childhood : Management-related issues. / ERS Task Force Monitoring Asthma in Children.

In: European respiratory review : an official journal of the European Respiratory Society, Vol. 24, No. 136, 01.06.2015, p. 194-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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