Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

K. Hijazi, T. Lowe, C. Meharg, S. H. Berry, J. Foley, G. L. Hold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation, the study contributes to the understanding of the potential role of mucosal microbiome changes in oral mucosal disease.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87S-94S
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume94
Issue number3 Suppl.1
Early online date24 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Mouth Mucosa
Veillonellaceae
Streptococcaceae
Mucous Membrane
Mouth Diseases
Sutton disease 2
Proteobacteria
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases
rRNA Genes
Causality
Disease Progression
Immunity

Keywords

  • chronic disease
  • oral ulcer
  • oral mucosa
  • microbiota
  • host-pathogen relations
  • high-throughput DNA sequencing

Cite this

Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. / Hijazi, K.; Lowe, T.; Meharg, C.; Berry, S. H.; Foley, J.; Hold, G. L.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 94, No. 3 Suppl.1, 03.2015, p. 87S-94S.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hijazi, K. ; Lowe, T. ; Meharg, C. ; Berry, S. H. ; Foley, J. ; Hold, G. L. / Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In: Journal of Dental Research. 2015 ; Vol. 94, No. 3 Suppl.1. pp. 87S-94S.
@article{7e7d04452ad142b4ad80ac0dafe38515,
title = "Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis",
abstract = "Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation, the study contributes to the understanding of the potential role of mucosal microbiome changes in oral mucosal disease.",
keywords = "chronic disease, oral ulcer, oral mucosa, microbiota, host-pathogen relations, high-throughput DNA sequencing",
author = "K. Hijazi and T. Lowe and C. Meharg and Berry, {S. H.} and J. Foley and Hold, {G. L.}",
note = "Acknowledgments This work was funded by Tenovus Scotland (registered charity SC009675, Glasgow, UK), award G12/09. We thank all patients and healthy volunteers for contributing to this study, as well as Moira Munro, Angela Reid, and Haleigh Scott for valuable assistance in patient recruitment. The authors declare no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the authorship and/or publication of this article.",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1177/0022034514565458",
language = "English",
volume = "94",
pages = "87S--94S",
journal = "Journal of Dental Research",
issn = "0022-0345",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3 Suppl.1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

AU - Hijazi, K.

AU - Lowe, T.

AU - Meharg, C.

AU - Berry, S. H.

AU - Foley, J.

AU - Hold, G. L.

N1 - Acknowledgments This work was funded by Tenovus Scotland (registered charity SC009675, Glasgow, UK), award G12/09. We thank all patients and healthy volunteers for contributing to this study, as well as Moira Munro, Angela Reid, and Haleigh Scott for valuable assistance in patient recruitment. The authors declare no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the authorship and/or publication of this article.

PY - 2015/3

Y1 - 2015/3

N2 - Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation, the study contributes to the understanding of the potential role of mucosal microbiome changes in oral mucosal disease.

AB - Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation, the study contributes to the understanding of the potential role of mucosal microbiome changes in oral mucosal disease.

KW - chronic disease

KW - oral ulcer

KW - oral mucosa

KW - microbiota

KW - host-pathogen relations

KW - high-throughput DNA sequencing

U2 - 10.1177/0022034514565458

DO - 10.1177/0022034514565458

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 87S-94S

JO - Journal of Dental Research

JF - Journal of Dental Research

SN - 0022-0345

IS - 3 Suppl.1

ER -