Multi-phase reactivations and inversions of Paleozoic–Mesozoic extensional basins during the Wilson cycle: case studies from the North Sea (UK) and the Northern Apennines (Italy)

Vittorio Scisciani, Stefano Patruno, Paolo Pace, Enrico Tavarnelli, Fernando Calamita, David Iacopini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Caledonian-Variscan orogens in Northern Europe and the Alpine-age Apennine range of Italy are classical examples of thrust belts that were developed at the expense of formerly rifted, passive continental margins that subsequently experienced various degrees of post-orogenic collapse and extension. The outer zones of orogenic belts and their adjoining foreland domains and regions where the effects of superposed deformations are mild-to-very mild, making it possible to recognise and separate structures produced at different times and to correctly establish their chronology and relationships. In this paper we integrate subsurface data (2- and 3D seismic reflection and well-logs), mainly from the North Sea, and structural field evidence, mainly from the Apennines, with the aim to reconstruct and refine the structural evolution of these two provinces that, in spite of their different ages and present-day structural framework, share repeated pulses of alternating extension and compression. The main outcome of this investigation is that in both scenarios, during repeated episodes of inversion that are a characteristic feature of the Wilson Cycle, inherited basement structures were effective in controlling stress localisation along faults affecting younger sedimentary cover rocks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205–243
Number of pages39
JournalSpecial Publication - Geological Society of London
Volume470
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2019

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reactivation
Caledonian orogeny
orogenic belt
Hercynian orogeny
basin
seismic reflection
chronology
continental margin
thrust
compression
rock
inversion
sea
young
Europe
effect
province

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Multi-phase reactivations and inversions of Paleozoic–Mesozoic extensional basins during the Wilson cycle : case studies from the North Sea (UK) and the Northern Apennines (Italy). / Scisciani, Vittorio; Patruno, Stefano; Pace, Paolo; Tavarnelli, Enrico; Calamita, Fernando; Iacopini, David.

In: Special Publication - Geological Society of London, Vol. 470, 03.05.2019, p. 205–243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scisciani, Vittorio ; Patruno, Stefano ; Pace, Paolo ; Tavarnelli, Enrico ; Calamita, Fernando ; Iacopini, David. / Multi-phase reactivations and inversions of Paleozoic–Mesozoic extensional basins during the Wilson cycle : case studies from the North Sea (UK) and the Northern Apennines (Italy). In: Special Publication - Geological Society of London. 2019 ; Vol. 470. pp. 205–243.
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abstract = "The Caledonian-Variscan orogens in Northern Europe and the Alpine-age Apennine range of Italy are classical examples of thrust belts that were developed at the expense of formerly rifted, passive continental margins that subsequently experienced various degrees of post-orogenic collapse and extension. The outer zones of orogenic belts and their adjoining foreland domains and regions where the effects of superposed deformations are mild-to-very mild, making it possible to recognise and separate structures produced at different times and to correctly establish their chronology and relationships. In this paper we integrate subsurface data (2- and 3D seismic reflection and well-logs), mainly from the North Sea, and structural field evidence, mainly from the Apennines, with the aim to reconstruct and refine the structural evolution of these two provinces that, in spite of their different ages and present-day structural framework, share repeated pulses of alternating extension and compression. The main outcome of this investigation is that in both scenarios, during repeated episodes of inversion that are a characteristic feature of the Wilson Cycle, inherited basement structures were effective in controlling stress localisation along faults affecting younger sedimentary cover rocks.",
author = "Vittorio Scisciani and Stefano Patruno and Paolo Pace and Enrico Tavarnelli and Fernando Calamita and David Iacopini",
note = "Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge PGS for the permission to publish the seismic sectionin Figure 11, from the 3D GeoStreamer North Sea dataset (BBK and NVG surveys). The Geological Society of Lon-don is also thanked for permission to reutilize, for parts of Figures 4c& 6–10 of this paper, images and seismic sec-tions that were previously published by Patrunoet al.(2018). We thank Dr Stuart Archer, Dr Thomas Phillips,Dr Robert W. Wilson and Prof. Ken McCaffrey for their thorough and helpful comments, which led to a much improved paper. Funding This work was supported by Chieti-PescaraUniversity funds (to V. Scisciani)",
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N1 - Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge PGS for the permission to publish the seismic sectionin Figure 11, from the 3D GeoStreamer North Sea dataset (BBK and NVG surveys). The Geological Society of Lon-don is also thanked for permission to reutilize, for parts of Figures 4c& 6–10 of this paper, images and seismic sec-tions that were previously published by Patrunoet al.(2018). We thank Dr Stuart Archer, Dr Thomas Phillips,Dr Robert W. Wilson and Prof. Ken McCaffrey for their thorough and helpful comments, which led to a much improved paper. Funding This work was supported by Chieti-PescaraUniversity funds (to V. Scisciani)

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AB - The Caledonian-Variscan orogens in Northern Europe and the Alpine-age Apennine range of Italy are classical examples of thrust belts that were developed at the expense of formerly rifted, passive continental margins that subsequently experienced various degrees of post-orogenic collapse and extension. The outer zones of orogenic belts and their adjoining foreland domains and regions where the effects of superposed deformations are mild-to-very mild, making it possible to recognise and separate structures produced at different times and to correctly establish their chronology and relationships. In this paper we integrate subsurface data (2- and 3D seismic reflection and well-logs), mainly from the North Sea, and structural field evidence, mainly from the Apennines, with the aim to reconstruct and refine the structural evolution of these two provinces that, in spite of their different ages and present-day structural framework, share repeated pulses of alternating extension and compression. The main outcome of this investigation is that in both scenarios, during repeated episodes of inversion that are a characteristic feature of the Wilson Cycle, inherited basement structures were effective in controlling stress localisation along faults affecting younger sedimentary cover rocks.

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