Multiple Job Holding, Skill Diversification, and Mobility

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this article, we investigate the interrelated dynamics of dual jobholding, human capital, occupational choice, and mobility, using a panel sample (1991-2005) of UK employees from the British Household Panel Survey. The evidence suggests that individuals may be using multiple jobholding as a conduit for obtaining new skills and expertise and as a stepping-stone to new careers, also involving self-employment. Individuals doing a different secondary job than their primary occupation are more likely to switch to a new primary job in the next year, and a job that is different than their current primary employment. The results show that there are human capital spillover effects between primary and secondary employment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-272
Number of pages50
JournalIndustrial Relations
Volume53
Issue number2
Early online date13 Mar 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Fingerprint

Switches
Personnel
Diversification
Human capital
Self-employment
Occupational mobility
Occupational choice
British Household Panel Survey
Expertise
Employees
Spillover effects

Keywords

  • moonlighting
  • occupational choice
  • human capital
  • mobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management
  • Industrial relations

Cite this

Multiple Job Holding, Skill Diversification, and Mobility. / Panos, Georgios A.; Pouliakas, Konstantinos; Zangelidis, Alexandros.

In: Industrial Relations, Vol. 53, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 223-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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