Musicians' memory for verbal and tonal materials under conditions of irrelevant sound

Victoria Williamson (Corresponding Author), Thomas Mitchell, Graham Hitch, Alan Baddeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studying short-term memory within the framework of the working memory model and its associated paradigms (Baddeley, 2000; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) offers the chance to compare similarities and differences between the way that verbal and tonal materials are processed. This study examined amateur musicians’ short-term memory using a newly adapted version of the visual-auditory (V-A) recognition method (Schendel & Palmer, 2007) within the framework of an irrelevant sound paradigm. We report evidence for a modality specific irrelevant sound effect: irrelevant tones disrupted memory for sequences of tones, whilst only irrelevant speech disrupted memory for sequences of letters. These preliminary results suggest that the adapted V-A recognition method will be useful for future parallel investigations of short-term memory for verbal and tonal materials.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-350
Number of pages20
JournalPsychology of Music
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

Short-Term Memory
Musicians
Short-term Memory
Tonal
Sound
Paradigm
Hearing
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • language
  • music
  • musicians
  • short-term memory
  • working memory model

Cite this

Musicians' memory for verbal and tonal materials under conditions of irrelevant sound. / Williamson, Victoria (Corresponding Author); Mitchell, Thomas; Hitch, Graham; Baddeley, Alan.

In: Psychology of Music, Vol. 38, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 331-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williamson, Victoria ; Mitchell, Thomas ; Hitch, Graham ; Baddeley, Alan. / Musicians' memory for verbal and tonal materials under conditions of irrelevant sound. In: Psychology of Music. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 331-350.
@article{bd2966e423464d88bab75b5df0ef028a,
title = "Musicians' memory for verbal and tonal materials under conditions of irrelevant sound",
abstract = "Studying short-term memory within the framework of the working memory model and its associated paradigms (Baddeley, 2000; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) offers the chance to compare similarities and differences between the way that verbal and tonal materials are processed. This study examined amateur musicians’ short-term memory using a newly adapted version of the visual-auditory (V-A) recognition method (Schendel & Palmer, 2007) within the framework of an irrelevant sound paradigm. We report evidence for a modality specific irrelevant sound effect: irrelevant tones disrupted memory for sequences of tones, whilst only irrelevant speech disrupted memory for sequences of letters. These preliminary results suggest that the adapted V-A recognition method will be useful for future parallel investigations of short-term memory for verbal and tonal materials.",
keywords = "language, music , musicians , short-term memory , working memory model",
author = "Victoria Williamson and Thomas Mitchell and Graham Hitch and Alan Baddeley",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1177/0305735609351918",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "331--350",
journal = "Psychology of Music",
issn = "0305-7356",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Musicians' memory for verbal and tonal materials under conditions of irrelevant sound

AU - Williamson, Victoria

AU - Mitchell, Thomas

AU - Hitch, Graham

AU - Baddeley, Alan

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Studying short-term memory within the framework of the working memory model and its associated paradigms (Baddeley, 2000; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) offers the chance to compare similarities and differences between the way that verbal and tonal materials are processed. This study examined amateur musicians’ short-term memory using a newly adapted version of the visual-auditory (V-A) recognition method (Schendel & Palmer, 2007) within the framework of an irrelevant sound paradigm. We report evidence for a modality specific irrelevant sound effect: irrelevant tones disrupted memory for sequences of tones, whilst only irrelevant speech disrupted memory for sequences of letters. These preliminary results suggest that the adapted V-A recognition method will be useful for future parallel investigations of short-term memory for verbal and tonal materials.

AB - Studying short-term memory within the framework of the working memory model and its associated paradigms (Baddeley, 2000; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974) offers the chance to compare similarities and differences between the way that verbal and tonal materials are processed. This study examined amateur musicians’ short-term memory using a newly adapted version of the visual-auditory (V-A) recognition method (Schendel & Palmer, 2007) within the framework of an irrelevant sound paradigm. We report evidence for a modality specific irrelevant sound effect: irrelevant tones disrupted memory for sequences of tones, whilst only irrelevant speech disrupted memory for sequences of letters. These preliminary results suggest that the adapted V-A recognition method will be useful for future parallel investigations of short-term memory for verbal and tonal materials.

KW - language

KW - music

KW - musicians

KW - short-term memory

KW - working memory model

U2 - 10.1177/0305735609351918

DO - 10.1177/0305735609351918

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 331

EP - 350

JO - Psychology of Music

JF - Psychology of Music

SN - 0305-7356

IS - 3

ER -