Myocardial infarction in men and women under 65 years of age: No evidence of gender bias

A. Bannerman, K. Hamilton, John David Norrie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We examined short and long term outcomes of MI in a consecutive series of 169 men and 50 women who were followed for an average of 3.5 Years. Similar percentages of men and women were admitted to medical intensive care, received in-patient cardiac rehabilitation. quit smoking at one year: were still smoking, were taking a lipid lowering drug or had returned to work, at one year, underwent coronary angiography at 3.5 years or had died by 3.5 years. The lack of gender difference in outcome may reflect an absence of gender bias in the management of men and women with MI in southwest Scotland.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)73-78
    Number of pages5
    JournalScottish Medical Journal
    Volume46
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Keywords

    • myocardial infarction
    • gender differences
    • short and long term outcomes
    • CORONARY HEART-DISEASE
    • SEX-RELATED DIFFERENCES
    • LONG-TERM PROGNOSIS
    • THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY
    • CASE-FATALITY
    • CARDIAC REHABILITATION
    • INTERVENTION REGISTRY
    • HOSPITAL MORTALITY
    • CLINICAL OUTCOMES
    • FOLLOW-UP

    Cite this

    Myocardial infarction in men and women under 65 years of age: No evidence of gender bias. / Bannerman, A.; Hamilton, K.; Norrie, John David.

    In: Scottish Medical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 3, 2001, p. 73-78.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bannerman, A, Hamilton, K & Norrie, JD 2001, 'Myocardial infarction in men and women under 65 years of age: No evidence of gender bias', Scottish Medical Journal, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 73-78.
    Bannerman, A. ; Hamilton, K. ; Norrie, John David. / Myocardial infarction in men and women under 65 years of age: No evidence of gender bias. In: Scottish Medical Journal. 2001 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 73-78.
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