Negative phenotypic and genetic correlation between natal dispersal propensity and nest-defence behaviour in a wild bird

Pierre Bize, Grégory Daniel, Vincent A. Viblanc, Julien Martin, Blandine Doligez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Natural selection is expected to favour the integration of dispersal and phenotypic traits allowing individuals to reduce dispersal costs. Accordingly, associations have been found between dispersal and personality traits such as aggressiveness and exploration, which may facilitate settlement in a novel environment. However, the determinism of these associations has only rarely been explored. Here, we highlight the functional integration of individual personality in nest-defence behaviour and natal dispersal propensity in a long-lived colonial bird, the Alpine swift (Apus melba), providing insights into genetic constraints shaping the co-evolution of these two traits. We report a negative association between natal dispersal and nest-defence (i.e. risk taking) behaviour both at the phenotypic and genetic level. This negative association may result from direct selection if risk-averseness benefits natal dispersers by reducing the costs of settlement in an unfamiliar environment, or from indirect selection if individuals with lower levels of nest-defence also show lower levels of aggressiveness, reducing costs of settlement among unfamiliar neighbours in a colony. In both cases, these results highlight that risk-taking is an important behavioural trait to consider in the study of dispersal evolution.
Original languageEnglish
Article number20170236
JournalBiology Letters
Volume13
Issue number7
Early online date26 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • dispersal costs
  • personality trait
  • heritability
  • behavioural syndrome
  • settlement
  • Apus melba

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Negative phenotypic and genetic correlation between natal dispersal propensity and nest-defence behaviour in a wild bird'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this