Neuromuscular and hormonal effects of a single session of whole body vibration

J. Erskine*, I. Smillie, J. Leiper, D. Ball, M. Cardinale

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular and hormonal responses following a single session of isometric half-squat exercise with and without the superimposition of whole body vibrations (WBV). Seven healthy males performed ten sets of one minute, with one minute rest between sets, of isometric exercise in half-squat position. This was conducted on two separate occasions, either with WBV (30 Hz; 3.5 g) or no vibration (Control). Maximal isometric unilateral knee extensions with doublet superimposed via percutaneous electrical stimulation were performed before and immediately following WBV and Control treatments. Significant decreases in maximal voluntary contraction were observed following both WBV and Control. Rate of torque development in the first 200 ms (RTD200ms). salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations, and voluntary activation were unaffected. However, RTD 200ms and T concentration tended to be lower following WBV only. The results of this study suggest that this acute WBV protocol does not greatly affect the neuroendocrine system, but does cause a low level of fatigue, most likely attributed to peripheral rather than central mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
Pages1698-1707
Number of pages10
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 4 Oct 20048 Oct 2004

Conference

ConferenceInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period4/10/048/10/04

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    Erskine, J., Smillie, I., Leiper, J., Ball, D., & Cardinale, M. (2004). Neuromuscular and hormonal effects of a single session of whole body vibration. In International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 (Vol. 3, pp. 1698-1707)