Neuropsychological impairment as a consequence of football (soccer) play and football heading

Preliminary analyses and report on university footballers

A. Rutherford, R. Stephens, D. Potter, Gordon Fernie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has claimed neuropsychological impairment occurs as a result of professional and amateur football play, and, specifically, football heading. However, much of this research exhibits substantial methodological problems (Rutherford, Stephens, & Potter, 2003). By investigating less committed amateur level footballers, the current study sought to gain some insight into the developmental history of any neuropsychological consequences of football play. University football, rugby and noncontact sports players were compared on a range of biographical and neuropsychological test variables. While playing their chosen sports, rugby players sustained many more head injuries than footballers and noncontact sportsmen, but footballers did not sustain significantly more head injuries than noncontact sportsmen. The number of head injuries sustained predicted Trails B and TAP Divided Attention latencies in a positive fashion. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, sport group effects were detected with TAP Divided Attention accuracy scores, with footballers exhibiting poorest performance. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, the total amount of heading done by footballers predicted the number of Wisconsin Card Sorting category shifts in a negative fashion. Nevertheless, over interpretation of all of these results should be resisted because of the exploratory nature of the analyses and the possibility that the sport groups may differ in ways other than just the nature of their sports activities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-319
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Soccer
Football
Craniocerebral Trauma
Sports
Neuropsychological Tests
Research
History

Keywords

  • traumatic brain injury
  • concussion
  • severity
  • recovery

Cite this

@article{157786c66ef042ea81bf750395e7da57,
title = "Neuropsychological impairment as a consequence of football (soccer) play and football heading: Preliminary analyses and report on university footballers",
abstract = "Previous research has claimed neuropsychological impairment occurs as a result of professional and amateur football play, and, specifically, football heading. However, much of this research exhibits substantial methodological problems (Rutherford, Stephens, & Potter, 2003). By investigating less committed amateur level footballers, the current study sought to gain some insight into the developmental history of any neuropsychological consequences of football play. University football, rugby and noncontact sports players were compared on a range of biographical and neuropsychological test variables. While playing their chosen sports, rugby players sustained many more head injuries than footballers and noncontact sportsmen, but footballers did not sustain significantly more head injuries than noncontact sportsmen. The number of head injuries sustained predicted Trails B and TAP Divided Attention latencies in a positive fashion. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, sport group effects were detected with TAP Divided Attention accuracy scores, with footballers exhibiting poorest performance. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, the total amount of heading done by footballers predicted the number of Wisconsin Card Sorting category shifts in a negative fashion. Nevertheless, over interpretation of all of these results should be resisted because of the exploratory nature of the analyses and the possibility that the sport groups may differ in ways other than just the nature of their sports activities.",
keywords = "traumatic brain injury, concussion, severity, recovery",
author = "A. Rutherford and R. Stephens and D. Potter and Gordon Fernie",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1080/13803390490515504",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "299--319",
journal = "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology",
issn = "0168-8634",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuropsychological impairment as a consequence of football (soccer) play and football heading

T2 - Preliminary analyses and report on university footballers

AU - Rutherford, A.

AU - Stephens, R.

AU - Potter, D.

AU - Fernie, Gordon

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Previous research has claimed neuropsychological impairment occurs as a result of professional and amateur football play, and, specifically, football heading. However, much of this research exhibits substantial methodological problems (Rutherford, Stephens, & Potter, 2003). By investigating less committed amateur level footballers, the current study sought to gain some insight into the developmental history of any neuropsychological consequences of football play. University football, rugby and noncontact sports players were compared on a range of biographical and neuropsychological test variables. While playing their chosen sports, rugby players sustained many more head injuries than footballers and noncontact sportsmen, but footballers did not sustain significantly more head injuries than noncontact sportsmen. The number of head injuries sustained predicted Trails B and TAP Divided Attention latencies in a positive fashion. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, sport group effects were detected with TAP Divided Attention accuracy scores, with footballers exhibiting poorest performance. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, the total amount of heading done by footballers predicted the number of Wisconsin Card Sorting category shifts in a negative fashion. Nevertheless, over interpretation of all of these results should be resisted because of the exploratory nature of the analyses and the possibility that the sport groups may differ in ways other than just the nature of their sports activities.

AB - Previous research has claimed neuropsychological impairment occurs as a result of professional and amateur football play, and, specifically, football heading. However, much of this research exhibits substantial methodological problems (Rutherford, Stephens, & Potter, 2003). By investigating less committed amateur level footballers, the current study sought to gain some insight into the developmental history of any neuropsychological consequences of football play. University football, rugby and noncontact sports players were compared on a range of biographical and neuropsychological test variables. While playing their chosen sports, rugby players sustained many more head injuries than footballers and noncontact sportsmen, but footballers did not sustain significantly more head injuries than noncontact sportsmen. The number of head injuries sustained predicted Trails B and TAP Divided Attention latencies in a positive fashion. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, sport group effects were detected with TAP Divided Attention accuracy scores, with footballers exhibiting poorest performance. After controlling for the number of head injuries sustained, the total amount of heading done by footballers predicted the number of Wisconsin Card Sorting category shifts in a negative fashion. Nevertheless, over interpretation of all of these results should be resisted because of the exploratory nature of the analyses and the possibility that the sport groups may differ in ways other than just the nature of their sports activities.

KW - traumatic brain injury

KW - concussion

KW - severity

KW - recovery

U2 - 10.1080/13803390490515504

DO - 10.1080/13803390490515504

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 299

EP - 319

JO - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

JF - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

SN - 0168-8634

IS - 3

ER -