No strong evidence of priming effects on the degradation of terrestrial plant detritus in estuarine sediments

Evangelia Gontikaki* (Corresponding Author), Ursula Witte (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The occurrence of priming effects (PEs) on the degradation of particulate terrestrial organic matter (OM) (13C-wheat detritus) was studied in marine sediments using phytoplankton detritus as priming inducer. Two scenarios, i.e., single-pulse vs. repetitive deposition of same amounts of algal detritus, were tested in sediment core incubation experiments. In the first case, a single pulse of phytodetritus emulated the sudden large input of phytoplanktonic material onto sediments following the decline of spring blooms in surface waters, whereas the repetitive deposition of small amounts of algal detritus represented the low, continuous flow of marine input of either pelagic or benthic origin that remains significant all year round. The mineralization rate of wheat detritus to 13CO2 in each treatment was measured on days 6, 8, 14, and 20 following the initiation of the experiment. No evidence of PEs on 13C-wheat mineralization upon the addition of labile phytodetritus could be detected in either scenario under the experimental conditions employed in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number327
JournalFrontiers in Marine Science
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

estuarine sediments
estuarine sediment
detritus
Sediments
Degradation
degradation
wheat
mineralization
phytodetritus
sediments
Springs (water)
Phytoplankton
marine sediments
Surface waters
Biological materials
surface water
particulates
Experiments
phytoplankton
organic matter

Keywords

  • Aquatic
  • Bacteria
  • Degradation
  • Marine
  • Priming effects
  • Sediment
  • Stable isotopes
  • Terrestrial organic matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Ocean Engineering

Cite this

No strong evidence of priming effects on the degradation of terrestrial plant detritus in estuarine sediments. / Gontikaki, Evangelia (Corresponding Author); Witte, Ursula (Corresponding Author).

In: Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 6, 327, 14.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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