Nutritional associations with bone loss during the menopausal transition: evidence of a beneficial effect of calcium, alcohol, and fruit and vegetable nutrients and of a detrimental effect of fatty acids

Helen Margaret MacDonald, S. A. New, Michael Henry Niven Golden, Marion Kay Campbell, David M Reid

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239 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The menopausal transition is characterized by rapid bone loss. Few data exist on the role of nutrition.

Objective: The objective of the study was to ascertain which dietary factors influence perimenopausal skeletal loss.

Design: A longitudinal study was conducted of 891 women aged 45-55 y at baseline and 50-59 y at follow-up 5-7 y later. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN). Nutrient intakes were assessed after the baseline visit and 5 y later, by using the same food-frequency questionnaire.

Results: After adjustment for energy intake and other confounders, higher intakes of calcium were correlated with change in FN BMD (ie, reduced loss) (r = 0.073, P < 0.05), and the intake of modest amounts of alcohol was associated with less lumbar spine bone loss (P < 0.01 for quartile of alcohol intake). Greater FN BMD loss was associated with increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = -0. 110, P < 0.01), monounsaturated fatty acids (r = -0.069, P < 0.05), retinol (r = -0.067; P < 0.05), and vitamin E (r = - 0.110; P < 0.01). The latter 2 nutrients were highly correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids. For premenopausal women, calcium and nutrients found in fruit and vegetables (vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium) were associated with FN BMD, and calcium, vitamin C, and magnesium were associated with change in FN BMD.

Conclusions: Although menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy use dominate women's bone health, diet may influence early postmenopausal bone loss. Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against premenopausal bone loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-165
Number of pages10
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2004

Keywords

  • menopause
  • bone loss
  • calcium
  • fatty acids
  • alcohol
  • fruit and vegetables
  • bone mineral density
  • FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE
  • SCOTTISH-HEART-HEALTH
  • MINERAL DENSITY
  • POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
  • DIETARY-INTAKE
  • ENERGY-INTAKE
  • FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES
  • POTASSIUM BICARBONATE
  • REGIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS
  • RECRUITMENT METHODS

Cite this

@article{f2226f7d8b4a493884a0b3302144bff7,
title = "Nutritional associations with bone loss during the menopausal transition: evidence of a beneficial effect of calcium, alcohol, and fruit and vegetable nutrients and of a detrimental effect of fatty acids",
abstract = "Background: The menopausal transition is characterized by rapid bone loss. Few data exist on the role of nutrition.Objective: The objective of the study was to ascertain which dietary factors influence perimenopausal skeletal loss.Design: A longitudinal study was conducted of 891 women aged 45-55 y at baseline and 50-59 y at follow-up 5-7 y later. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN). Nutrient intakes were assessed after the baseline visit and 5 y later, by using the same food-frequency questionnaire.Results: After adjustment for energy intake and other confounders, higher intakes of calcium were correlated with change in FN BMD (ie, reduced loss) (r = 0.073, P < 0.05), and the intake of modest amounts of alcohol was associated with less lumbar spine bone loss (P < 0.01 for quartile of alcohol intake). Greater FN BMD loss was associated with increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = -0. 110, P < 0.01), monounsaturated fatty acids (r = -0.069, P < 0.05), retinol (r = -0.067; P < 0.05), and vitamin E (r = - 0.110; P < 0.01). The latter 2 nutrients were highly correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids. For premenopausal women, calcium and nutrients found in fruit and vegetables (vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium) were associated with FN BMD, and calcium, vitamin C, and magnesium were associated with change in FN BMD.Conclusions: Although menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy use dominate women's bone health, diet may influence early postmenopausal bone loss. Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against premenopausal bone loss.",
keywords = "menopause, bone loss, calcium, fatty acids, alcohol, fruit and vegetables, bone mineral density, FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE, SCOTTISH-HEART-HEALTH, MINERAL DENSITY, POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN, DIETARY-INTAKE, ENERGY-INTAKE, FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES, POTASSIUM BICARBONATE, REGIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS, RECRUITMENT METHODS",
author = "MacDonald, {Helen Margaret} and New, {S. A.} and Golden, {Michael Henry Niven} and Campbell, {Marion Kay} and Reid, {David M}",
year = "2004",
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journal = "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Nutritional associations with bone loss during the menopausal transition: evidence of a beneficial effect of calcium, alcohol, and fruit and vegetable nutrients and of a detrimental effect of fatty acids

AU - MacDonald, Helen Margaret

AU - New, S. A.

AU - Golden, Michael Henry Niven

AU - Campbell, Marion Kay

AU - Reid, David M

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - Background: The menopausal transition is characterized by rapid bone loss. Few data exist on the role of nutrition.Objective: The objective of the study was to ascertain which dietary factors influence perimenopausal skeletal loss.Design: A longitudinal study was conducted of 891 women aged 45-55 y at baseline and 50-59 y at follow-up 5-7 y later. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN). Nutrient intakes were assessed after the baseline visit and 5 y later, by using the same food-frequency questionnaire.Results: After adjustment for energy intake and other confounders, higher intakes of calcium were correlated with change in FN BMD (ie, reduced loss) (r = 0.073, P < 0.05), and the intake of modest amounts of alcohol was associated with less lumbar spine bone loss (P < 0.01 for quartile of alcohol intake). Greater FN BMD loss was associated with increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = -0. 110, P < 0.01), monounsaturated fatty acids (r = -0.069, P < 0.05), retinol (r = -0.067; P < 0.05), and vitamin E (r = - 0.110; P < 0.01). The latter 2 nutrients were highly correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids. For premenopausal women, calcium and nutrients found in fruit and vegetables (vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium) were associated with FN BMD, and calcium, vitamin C, and magnesium were associated with change in FN BMD.Conclusions: Although menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy use dominate women's bone health, diet may influence early postmenopausal bone loss. Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against premenopausal bone loss.

AB - Background: The menopausal transition is characterized by rapid bone loss. Few data exist on the role of nutrition.Objective: The objective of the study was to ascertain which dietary factors influence perimenopausal skeletal loss.Design: A longitudinal study was conducted of 891 women aged 45-55 y at baseline and 50-59 y at follow-up 5-7 y later. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN). Nutrient intakes were assessed after the baseline visit and 5 y later, by using the same food-frequency questionnaire.Results: After adjustment for energy intake and other confounders, higher intakes of calcium were correlated with change in FN BMD (ie, reduced loss) (r = 0.073, P < 0.05), and the intake of modest amounts of alcohol was associated with less lumbar spine bone loss (P < 0.01 for quartile of alcohol intake). Greater FN BMD loss was associated with increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = -0. 110, P < 0.01), monounsaturated fatty acids (r = -0.069, P < 0.05), retinol (r = -0.067; P < 0.05), and vitamin E (r = - 0.110; P < 0.01). The latter 2 nutrients were highly correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids. For premenopausal women, calcium and nutrients found in fruit and vegetables (vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium) were associated with FN BMD, and calcium, vitamin C, and magnesium were associated with change in FN BMD.Conclusions: Although menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy use dominate women's bone health, diet may influence early postmenopausal bone loss. Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against premenopausal bone loss.

KW - menopause

KW - bone loss

KW - calcium

KW - fatty acids

KW - alcohol

KW - fruit and vegetables

KW - bone mineral density

KW - FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - SCOTTISH-HEART-HEALTH

KW - MINERAL DENSITY

KW - POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

KW - DIETARY-INTAKE

KW - ENERGY-INTAKE

KW - FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES

KW - POTASSIUM BICARBONATE

KW - REGIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS

KW - RECRUITMENT METHODS

M3 - Article

VL - 79

SP - 155

EP - 165

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 1

ER -