Nutritional influences on the gut microbiota and the consequences for gastrointestinal health

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human colonic microbiota degrades dietary substrates that are indigestible in the upper GIT (gastrointestinal tract), releasing bacterial metabolites, some of which are important for gut health. Advances in molecular biology techniques have facilitated detailed analyses of the composition of the bacterial community resident in the lower GIT. Such analyses have indicated that more than 500 different bacterial species colonize an individual, and that, although there is much functional consistency in the resident bacterial groups, there is considerable inter-individual variation at the species/strain level. The bacterial community develops during early childhood until it reaches an adult-like composition. Whereas colonization and host factors influence the species composition, dietary factors also have an important impact, with specific bacterial groups changing in response to specific dietary interventions. Since bacterial species have different metabolic activities, specific diets have various consequences for health, dependent on the effect exerted on the bacterial population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1073-1078
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2011
EventThe Biochemical society special interest meeting - Durham, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Mar 201122 Mar 2011

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Health
Lower Gastrointestinal Tract
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Microbiota
Chemical analysis
Molecular Biology
Molecular biology
Nutrition
Metabolites
Diet
Population
Substrates
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Keywords

  • anaerobe
  • dietary carbohydrate
  • gut microbiota
  • human colon
  • resistant starch
  • short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)
  • butyrate-producing bacteria
  • intestinal microbiota
  • roseburia-inulinivorans
  • Chrons-Disease
  • bifidobacterium
  • fermentation
  • communities
  • metabolism
  • prebiotics

Cite this

Nutritional influences on the gut microbiota and the consequences for gastrointestinal health. / Scott, Karen P.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.08.2011, p. 1073-1078.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

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