Obesity

How dangerous is weight gain between pregnancies?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Babies of women with a high BMI have an increased chance of dying in utero or soon after birth, but how weight gain between pregnancies affects this phenomenon is unclear. Findings in a new study suggest that a BMI rise of ≥4 kg/m2 between pregnancies can amplify the risk of stillbirth and neonatal mortality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-130
Number of pages3
JournalNature Reviews Endocrinology
Volume12
Issue number3
Early online date29 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Obesity
Pregnancy
Stillbirth
Infant Mortality
Birth Weight

Keywords

  • obesity
  • outcomes research
  • pregnancy outcome
  • weight management

Cite this

Obesity : How dangerous is weight gain between pregnancies? / Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Bhattacharya, Siladitya.

In: Nature Reviews Endocrinology , Vol. 12, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 128-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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