Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera

Hongyue Sun, Philip William Benzie, Nicholas Michael Burns, David Cyril Hendry, John Watson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Abstract—In this paper, we describe an electronic holographic camera that has been developed for in situ underwater studies of the distribution and dynamics of plankton and other marine organisms and particles. Holographic data are stored on an embedded computer in the camera for later data extraction and analysis. We describe the main optical and mechanical specifications and outline the design, development and operation of eHoloCam. We summarise the eHoloCam performance in four in situ deployments in North Sea and Faeroe Channels at water depths ranging from about 10 m to 450 m with research vessel Scotia. eHoloCam is capable of capturing opaque and transparent organisms in the size range from about 50 µm up to a 10 millimetres. A clear advantage of eHoloCam over other imaging and counting techniques is the ability to capture high-resolution images without destroying the organism. This feature is extremely valuable in facilitating new in-situ studies of plankton dynamics. The recorded holographic videos are reconstructed numerically using one of our reconstruction algorithms at various planes through the light path. The overall system resolution for the recorded images is 8 µm and 36 µm at a distance of 100 mm and 470 mm, respectively. We show various images of marine organisms recorded on these 4 cruises, and preliminary data on size distributions of Calanus are also presented and discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOCEANS 2007
Subtitle of host publicationEurope
Place of PublicationLos Alamitos
PublisherIEEE Press
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)142440634X, 9781424406357
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2007
EventOCEANS 2007: Europe - Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Duration: 18 Jun 200721 Jun 2007
https://www.tib.eu/en/search/id/TIBKAT%3A557478170/ (Link to Conference proceedings from TIB)

Conference

ConferenceOCEANS 2007: Europe
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAberdeen
Period18/06/0721/06/07
Internet address

Fingerprint

plankton
organisms
oceans
cameras
electronics
North Sea
water depth
imaging techniques
vessels
specifications
counting
high resolution

Keywords

  • digital holography,
  • marine plankton,
  • image

Cite this

Sun, H., Benzie, P. W., Burns, N. M., Hendry, D. C., & Watson, J. (2007). Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera. In OCEANS 2007: Europe (pp. 1-6). Los Alamitos: IEEE Press. https://doi.org/10.1109/OCEANSE.2007.4302486

Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera. / Sun, Hongyue; Benzie, Philip William; Burns, Nicholas Michael; Hendry, David Cyril; Watson, John.

OCEANS 2007: Europe. Los Alamitos : IEEE Press, 2007. p. 1-6.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sun, H, Benzie, PW, Burns, NM, Hendry, DC & Watson, J 2007, Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera. in OCEANS 2007: Europe. IEEE Press, Los Alamitos, pp. 1-6, OCEANS 2007: Europe, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, 18/06/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/OCEANSE.2007.4302486
Sun H, Benzie PW, Burns NM, Hendry DC, Watson J. Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera. In OCEANS 2007: Europe. Los Alamitos: IEEE Press. 2007. p. 1-6 https://doi.org/10.1109/OCEANSE.2007.4302486
Sun, Hongyue ; Benzie, Philip William ; Burns, Nicholas Michael ; Hendry, David Cyril ; Watson, John. / Ocean Plankton Imaging Using an Electronic Holographic Camera. OCEANS 2007: Europe. Los Alamitos : IEEE Press, 2007. pp. 1-6
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