Older mothers produce more successful daughters

Svenja B. Kroeger*, Daniel T. Blumstein, Kenneth B. Armitage, Jane M. Reid, Julien G. A. Martin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Annual reproductive success and senescence patterns vary substantially among individuals in the wild. However, it is still seldom considered that senescencemay not only affect an individual, but also affect age-specific reproductive success in its offspring, generating transgenerational reproductive senescence. We used long-term data from wild yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) living in two different elevational environments to quantify age-specific reproductive success of daughters born to mothers differing in age. Contrary to prediction, daughters born to older mothers had greater annual reproductive success
on average than daughters born to younger mothers, and this translated into greater lifetime reproductive success. However, in the favorable lower elevation environment, daughters born to older mothers also had greater age-specific decreases in annual reproductive success. In the harsher higher elevation environment on the other hand, daughters born to older mothers tended to
die prior to reaching ages where such senescent decreases could be observed. Our study highlights the importance of incorporating environment-specific transgenerational parent age effects on adult offspring age-specific life-history traits to fully understand the substantial variation observed in senescence patterns in wild populations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4809-4814
Number of pages6
JournalPNAS
Volume117
Issue number9
Early online date18 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Aging
  • life-history strategies
  • reproductive trade-offs
  • resource allocation
  • Life-history strategies
  • Resource allocation
  • Reproductive trade-offs
  • SIZE
  • SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATION
  • RATES
  • COSTS
  • YELLOW-BELLIED MARMOTS
  • FITNESS CONSEQUENCES
  • LIFE-HISTORY
  • REPRODUCTIVE SENESCENCE
  • aging
  • TRADE-OFFS
  • LONG

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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  • Cite this

    Kroeger, S. B., Blumstein, D. T., Armitage, K. B., Reid, J. M., & Martin, J. G. A. (2020). Older mothers produce more successful daughters. PNAS, 117(9), 4809-4814. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1908551117