Oral mucosal lesions related to dental restorative materials.

Y. Issa, P. A. Brunton, Tatiana MacFarlane, A. J. Duxbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To determine the effectiveness of replacing restorations considered to be the cause of an oral lichenoid lesion (oral lichenoid reaction)(OLL).

Design Clinical intervention and nine-month follow up. Setting The study was carried out in the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, 1998-2002.

Subjects and methods A total of 51 patients, mean age 53 (SD 13) years, who had oral lesions or symptoms suspected to be related to their dental restorations were investigated. Baseline patch tests for a series of dental materials, biopsies and photographs were undertaken. Thirty-nine out of 51 (76%) of patients had their restorations replaced.

Results The clinical manifestations of OLL were variable; the majority of OLL were found to be in the molar and retro molar area of the buccal mucosa and the tongue. Twenty-seven (53%) patients had positive patch test reactions to at least one material, 24 of them for one or more mercury compound. After a mean follow up period of nine months, lesions adjacent to replaced restorations completely healed in 16 (42%) patients (10 positive and 6 negative patch tests). Improvement in signs and symptoms were found in 18 (47%) patients (11 positive and 7 negative patch tests).

Conclusion OLLs may be elicited by some dental restorations. Replacing restorations adjacent to these lesions is associated with healing in the majority of cases particularly when lesions are in close contact with restorations. A patch test seems to be of limited benefit as a predictor of such reactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)361-366
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Dental Journal
Volume198
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • MUCOSAL LESIONS
  • AMALGAM REPLACEMENT
  • CONTACT LESIONS
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • PLANUS
  • HYPERSENSITIVITY
  • ALLERGY
  • MERCURY
  • NICKEL
  • CHROMIUM

Cite this

Oral mucosal lesions related to dental restorative materials. / Issa, Y.; Brunton, P. A.; MacFarlane, Tatiana; Duxbury, A. J.

In: British Dental Journal, Vol. 198, 2005, p. 361-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Issa, Y. ; Brunton, P. A. ; MacFarlane, Tatiana ; Duxbury, A. J. / Oral mucosal lesions related to dental restorative materials. In: British Dental Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 198. pp. 361-366.
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abstract = "Objectives To determine the effectiveness of replacing restorations considered to be the cause of an oral lichenoid lesion (oral lichenoid reaction)(OLL).Design Clinical intervention and nine-month follow up. Setting The study was carried out in the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, 1998-2002.Subjects and methods A total of 51 patients, mean age 53 (SD 13) years, who had oral lesions or symptoms suspected to be related to their dental restorations were investigated. Baseline patch tests for a series of dental materials, biopsies and photographs were undertaken. Thirty-nine out of 51 (76{\%}) of patients had their restorations replaced.Results The clinical manifestations of OLL were variable; the majority of OLL were found to be in the molar and retro molar area of the buccal mucosa and the tongue. Twenty-seven (53{\%}) patients had positive patch test reactions to at least one material, 24 of them for one or more mercury compound. After a mean follow up period of nine months, lesions adjacent to replaced restorations completely healed in 16 (42{\%}) patients (10 positive and 6 negative patch tests). Improvement in signs and symptoms were found in 18 (47{\%}) patients (11 positive and 7 negative patch tests).Conclusion OLLs may be elicited by some dental restorations. Replacing restorations adjacent to these lesions is associated with healing in the majority of cases particularly when lesions are in close contact with restorations. A patch test seems to be of limited benefit as a predictor of such reactions.",
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N2 - Objectives To determine the effectiveness of replacing restorations considered to be the cause of an oral lichenoid lesion (oral lichenoid reaction)(OLL).Design Clinical intervention and nine-month follow up. Setting The study was carried out in the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, 1998-2002.Subjects and methods A total of 51 patients, mean age 53 (SD 13) years, who had oral lesions or symptoms suspected to be related to their dental restorations were investigated. Baseline patch tests for a series of dental materials, biopsies and photographs were undertaken. Thirty-nine out of 51 (76%) of patients had their restorations replaced.Results The clinical manifestations of OLL were variable; the majority of OLL were found to be in the molar and retro molar area of the buccal mucosa and the tongue. Twenty-seven (53%) patients had positive patch test reactions to at least one material, 24 of them for one or more mercury compound. After a mean follow up period of nine months, lesions adjacent to replaced restorations completely healed in 16 (42%) patients (10 positive and 6 negative patch tests). Improvement in signs and symptoms were found in 18 (47%) patients (11 positive and 7 negative patch tests).Conclusion OLLs may be elicited by some dental restorations. Replacing restorations adjacent to these lesions is associated with healing in the majority of cases particularly when lesions are in close contact with restorations. A patch test seems to be of limited benefit as a predictor of such reactions.

AB - Objectives To determine the effectiveness of replacing restorations considered to be the cause of an oral lichenoid lesion (oral lichenoid reaction)(OLL).Design Clinical intervention and nine-month follow up. Setting The study was carried out in the University Dental Hospital of Manchester, 1998-2002.Subjects and methods A total of 51 patients, mean age 53 (SD 13) years, who had oral lesions or symptoms suspected to be related to their dental restorations were investigated. Baseline patch tests for a series of dental materials, biopsies and photographs were undertaken. Thirty-nine out of 51 (76%) of patients had their restorations replaced.Results The clinical manifestations of OLL were variable; the majority of OLL were found to be in the molar and retro molar area of the buccal mucosa and the tongue. Twenty-seven (53%) patients had positive patch test reactions to at least one material, 24 of them for one or more mercury compound. After a mean follow up period of nine months, lesions adjacent to replaced restorations completely healed in 16 (42%) patients (10 positive and 6 negative patch tests). Improvement in signs and symptoms were found in 18 (47%) patients (11 positive and 7 negative patch tests).Conclusion OLLs may be elicited by some dental restorations. Replacing restorations adjacent to these lesions is associated with healing in the majority of cases particularly when lesions are in close contact with restorations. A patch test seems to be of limited benefit as a predictor of such reactions.

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