Paid work, household work, or leisure? Time allocation pathways among women following a cancer diagnosis

Ni Gao*, Mandy Ryan, Nicolas Krucien, Suzanne Robinson, Richard Norman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There is extensive evidence on the relationship between receiving a cancer diagnosis and labour market outcomes. However, there is limited evidence on the relationship between a cancer diagnosis and non-labour market outcomes such as household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Furthermore, most current research focuses on time allocation at a given time point, ignoring both the life course perspective and long term effects. Methods: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), we observe time allocation for 91 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 486 women diagnosed with skin cancer, and 2711 women living without cancer. Our analysis is unique in combining sequence analysis and multivariate multinomial logit modelling. Using sequence analysis, we first analyse life-courses post a cancer diagnosis for paid work, household work, passive leisure and physical leisure from 2004 to 2016. Using multivariate multinomial logit modelling, we test whether a cancer diagnosis influences such life-courses. We consider the robustness of results to cancer severity and change in time allocation before and after a cancer diagnosis. Results: We identify three clusters for paid work and two clusters for household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Neither a breast cancer nor skin cancer diagnosis has a significant effect on the pathways of time allocation. Such results are robust to severity of diagnosis with ‘cured’ and ‘non-cured’ breast cancer, and skin cancer treated with and without ‘chemotherapy or radiotherapy’. Women post a breast cancer diagnosis are less likely to maintain their pre-cancer's time use on paid work, household work and passive leisure; however, such effects are not significant. Conclusion: Being diagnosed with breast cancer or skin cancer has no significant long-term effect on the pathways of time allocation. Future work should explore the relationship between time allocation and wellbeing and the preference for time allocation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112776
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume246
Early online date31 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Leisure Activities
cancer
Skin Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Sequence Analysis
time
Cancer
Household
Pathway
Leisure
Women's Health
Longitudinal Studies
Radiotherapy
Breast Cancer
research focus
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Cancer diagnosis
  • Multivariate multinomial logit
  • Sequence analysis
  • Time allocation
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Paid work, household work, or leisure? Time allocation pathways among women following a cancer diagnosis. / Gao, Ni; Ryan, Mandy; Krucien, Nicolas; Robinson, Suzanne; Norman, Richard.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 246, 112776, 02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: There is extensive evidence on the relationship between receiving a cancer diagnosis and labour market outcomes. However, there is limited evidence on the relationship between a cancer diagnosis and non-labour market outcomes such as household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Furthermore, most current research focuses on time allocation at a given time point, ignoring both the life course perspective and long term effects. Methods: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), we observe time allocation for 91 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 486 women diagnosed with skin cancer, and 2711 women living without cancer. Our analysis is unique in combining sequence analysis and multivariate multinomial logit modelling. Using sequence analysis, we first analyse life-courses post a cancer diagnosis for paid work, household work, passive leisure and physical leisure from 2004 to 2016. Using multivariate multinomial logit modelling, we test whether a cancer diagnosis influences such life-courses. We consider the robustness of results to cancer severity and change in time allocation before and after a cancer diagnosis. Results: We identify three clusters for paid work and two clusters for household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Neither a breast cancer nor skin cancer diagnosis has a significant effect on the pathways of time allocation. Such results are robust to severity of diagnosis with ‘cured’ and ‘non-cured’ breast cancer, and skin cancer treated with and without ‘chemotherapy or radiotherapy’. Women post a breast cancer diagnosis are less likely to maintain their pre-cancer's time use on paid work, household work and passive leisure; however, such effects are not significant. Conclusion: Being diagnosed with breast cancer or skin cancer has no significant long-term effect on the pathways of time allocation. Future work should explore the relationship between time allocation and wellbeing and the preference for time allocation.",
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AU - Gao, Ni

AU - Ryan, Mandy

AU - Krucien, Nicolas

AU - Robinson, Suzanne

AU - Norman, Richard

N1 - NG is funded by the Aberdeen-Curtin Joint Studentship (University of Aberdeen Development Trust) and the Elphinstone Scholarship Scheme.

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N2 - Background: There is extensive evidence on the relationship between receiving a cancer diagnosis and labour market outcomes. However, there is limited evidence on the relationship between a cancer diagnosis and non-labour market outcomes such as household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Furthermore, most current research focuses on time allocation at a given time point, ignoring both the life course perspective and long term effects. Methods: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), we observe time allocation for 91 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 486 women diagnosed with skin cancer, and 2711 women living without cancer. Our analysis is unique in combining sequence analysis and multivariate multinomial logit modelling. Using sequence analysis, we first analyse life-courses post a cancer diagnosis for paid work, household work, passive leisure and physical leisure from 2004 to 2016. Using multivariate multinomial logit modelling, we test whether a cancer diagnosis influences such life-courses. We consider the robustness of results to cancer severity and change in time allocation before and after a cancer diagnosis. Results: We identify three clusters for paid work and two clusters for household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Neither a breast cancer nor skin cancer diagnosis has a significant effect on the pathways of time allocation. Such results are robust to severity of diagnosis with ‘cured’ and ‘non-cured’ breast cancer, and skin cancer treated with and without ‘chemotherapy or radiotherapy’. Women post a breast cancer diagnosis are less likely to maintain their pre-cancer's time use on paid work, household work and passive leisure; however, such effects are not significant. Conclusion: Being diagnosed with breast cancer or skin cancer has no significant long-term effect on the pathways of time allocation. Future work should explore the relationship between time allocation and wellbeing and the preference for time allocation.

AB - Background: There is extensive evidence on the relationship between receiving a cancer diagnosis and labour market outcomes. However, there is limited evidence on the relationship between a cancer diagnosis and non-labour market outcomes such as household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Furthermore, most current research focuses on time allocation at a given time point, ignoring both the life course perspective and long term effects. Methods: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), we observe time allocation for 91 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 486 women diagnosed with skin cancer, and 2711 women living without cancer. Our analysis is unique in combining sequence analysis and multivariate multinomial logit modelling. Using sequence analysis, we first analyse life-courses post a cancer diagnosis for paid work, household work, passive leisure and physical leisure from 2004 to 2016. Using multivariate multinomial logit modelling, we test whether a cancer diagnosis influences such life-courses. We consider the robustness of results to cancer severity and change in time allocation before and after a cancer diagnosis. Results: We identify three clusters for paid work and two clusters for household work, passive leisure and physical leisure. Neither a breast cancer nor skin cancer diagnosis has a significant effect on the pathways of time allocation. Such results are robust to severity of diagnosis with ‘cured’ and ‘non-cured’ breast cancer, and skin cancer treated with and without ‘chemotherapy or radiotherapy’. Women post a breast cancer diagnosis are less likely to maintain their pre-cancer's time use on paid work, household work and passive leisure; however, such effects are not significant. Conclusion: Being diagnosed with breast cancer or skin cancer has no significant long-term effect on the pathways of time allocation. Future work should explore the relationship between time allocation and wellbeing and the preference for time allocation.

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