'Part of Who we are as a School Should Include Responsibility for Well-Being': Links between the School Environment, Mental Health and Behaviour

Jennifer Carol Spratt, J. Shucksmith, Kate Philip, C Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing from a Scottish study, this article examines ways in which the school environment can impact upon the well-being of pupils and their associated behaviour. It identifies tensions between existing school structures and cultures and the promotion of positive mental health, particularly in relation to the curriculum, pastoral care, discipline and teacher/pupil relationships. In many cases, schools attempt to address mental well-being by bolting fragmented initiatives onto existing systems, and we argue that a more fundamental review of values, policies and practices throughout the school is needed. This paper also looks at the roles of interagency workers in schools, and reports that, in most cases, these workers are seen as offering a parallel service to the mainstream school, targeted at the most troubled or troublesome pupils. We suggest that schools should draw on the skills and understandings of these workers to help build new cultures throughout the school for the benefit of all children and young people.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-21
Number of pages8
JournalPastoral Care in Education
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Mental Health
well-being
mental health
responsibility
school
Pupil
worker
pupil
teacher-pupil relationship
Pastoral Care
Curriculum
promotion
curriculum

Keywords

  • emotional well-being
  • schools
  • mental-health
  • interagency working

Cite this

'Part of Who we are as a School Should Include Responsibility for Well-Being' : Links between the School Environment, Mental Health and Behaviour . / Spratt, Jennifer Carol; Shucksmith, J.; Philip, Kate; Watson, C.

In: Pastoral Care in Education, Vol. 24, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 14-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{637b70f463f54cadafa5fb1b2362a282,
title = "'Part of Who we are as a School Should Include Responsibility for Well-Being': Links between the School Environment, Mental Health and Behaviour",
abstract = "Drawing from a Scottish study, this article examines ways in which the school environment can impact upon the well-being of pupils and their associated behaviour. It identifies tensions between existing school structures and cultures and the promotion of positive mental health, particularly in relation to the curriculum, pastoral care, discipline and teacher/pupil relationships. In many cases, schools attempt to address mental well-being by bolting fragmented initiatives onto existing systems, and we argue that a more fundamental review of values, policies and practices throughout the school is needed. This paper also looks at the roles of interagency workers in schools, and reports that, in most cases, these workers are seen as offering a parallel service to the mainstream school, targeted at the most troubled or troublesome pupils. We suggest that schools should draw on the skills and understandings of these workers to help build new cultures throughout the school for the benefit of all children and young people.",
keywords = "emotional well-being, schools, mental-health, interagency working",
author = "Spratt, {Jennifer Carol} and J. Shucksmith and Kate Philip and C Watson",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/j.1468-0122.2006.00374.x",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "14--21",
journal = "Pastoral Care in Education",
issn = "0264-3944",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Part of Who we are as a School Should Include Responsibility for Well-Being'

T2 - Links between the School Environment, Mental Health and Behaviour

AU - Spratt, Jennifer Carol

AU - Shucksmith, J.

AU - Philip, Kate

AU - Watson, C

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Drawing from a Scottish study, this article examines ways in which the school environment can impact upon the well-being of pupils and their associated behaviour. It identifies tensions between existing school structures and cultures and the promotion of positive mental health, particularly in relation to the curriculum, pastoral care, discipline and teacher/pupil relationships. In many cases, schools attempt to address mental well-being by bolting fragmented initiatives onto existing systems, and we argue that a more fundamental review of values, policies and practices throughout the school is needed. This paper also looks at the roles of interagency workers in schools, and reports that, in most cases, these workers are seen as offering a parallel service to the mainstream school, targeted at the most troubled or troublesome pupils. We suggest that schools should draw on the skills and understandings of these workers to help build new cultures throughout the school for the benefit of all children and young people.

AB - Drawing from a Scottish study, this article examines ways in which the school environment can impact upon the well-being of pupils and their associated behaviour. It identifies tensions between existing school structures and cultures and the promotion of positive mental health, particularly in relation to the curriculum, pastoral care, discipline and teacher/pupil relationships. In many cases, schools attempt to address mental well-being by bolting fragmented initiatives onto existing systems, and we argue that a more fundamental review of values, policies and practices throughout the school is needed. This paper also looks at the roles of interagency workers in schools, and reports that, in most cases, these workers are seen as offering a parallel service to the mainstream school, targeted at the most troubled or troublesome pupils. We suggest that schools should draw on the skills and understandings of these workers to help build new cultures throughout the school for the benefit of all children and young people.

KW - emotional well-being

KW - schools

KW - mental-health

KW - interagency working

U2 - 10.1111/j.1468-0122.2006.00374.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1468-0122.2006.00374.x

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 14

EP - 21

JO - Pastoral Care in Education

JF - Pastoral Care in Education

SN - 0264-3944

IS - 3

ER -