'Pass the buzzy thing, please'. Recognising and understanding information: an essential non-technical skill element for the efficient scrub practitioner

Lucy Mitchell, Janet Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Adverse events are unintended injuries or complications that are caused by the management of a patient's care rather than by their underlying medical condition. Research into adverse events in hospitals has demonstrated that the operating theatre is one area of healthcare where there is room for improvement, with 41% of all adverse events occurring in the operating theatre, according to one systematic review (deVries et al 2008). Despite technical guidelines, there are still instances of sponges and instruments being retained within patients (Gawande et al 2003) and the factors contributing to this may include assertiveness issues and communication between perioperative and medical staff, i.e. non-technical skills.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-205
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Perioperative Practice
Volume21
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

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Patient Care Management
Assertiveness
Medical Staff
Porifera
Communication
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries
Research

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'Pass the buzzy thing, please'. Recognising and understanding information : an essential non-technical skill element for the efficient scrub practitioner. / Mitchell, Lucy; Mitchell, Janet.

In: Journal of Perioperative Practice, Vol. 21, No. 6, 06.2011, p. 203-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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