Patient-specific factors relating to medication adherence in a post-percutaneous coronary intervention cohort

Gordon Rushworth (Corresponding Author), Scott Cunningham, Alasdair James Mort, Ian Rudd, Stephen Leslie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To explore the association between medication adherence and qualitatively characterised patient-specific themes relating to medication adherence in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods Data collection questionnaires and qualitative topic guides were piloted in two patients. A validated questionnaire generated an adherence score for a convenience sample of 20 patients within 7 days of PCI. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were subsequently carried out with all patients to explore patient-specific themes relating to measured medication adherence.
Key findings Fourteen out of 20 patients (70%) had scores indicative of good adherence. Key factors associated with good adherence included having a good relationship with the doctor, having an understanding of the condition, knowledge of the indications and consequences of non-adherence, perceived health benefits and medications eliciting tangible symptom control. There were misconceptions of concern regarding adverse drug reactions and the importance of aspirin, both of which had a negative effect on adherence. The role of the community pharmacist was sometimes, although not always, misunderstood.
Conclusion This study suggests there is an association between patients’ beliefs, knowledge, understanding and misconceptions about medication and their adherence in a post-PCI cohort. To optimise medication adherence it is vital for prescribers to remain patient-focused and cognisant of patient-specific themes relating to medication adherence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)226-237
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume20
Issue number4
Early online date3 Feb 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

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Medication Adherence
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Aspirin
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Insurance Benefits
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Pharmacists
Interviews

Keywords

  • aspirin
  • medication adherence
  • PCI
  • percutaneous coronary intervention

Cite this

Patient-specific factors relating to medication adherence in a post-percutaneous coronary intervention cohort. / Rushworth, Gordon (Corresponding Author); Cunningham, Scott; Mort, Alasdair James; Rudd, Ian; Leslie, Stephen.

In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 20, No. 4, 08.2012, p. 226-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rushworth, Gordon ; Cunningham, Scott ; Mort, Alasdair James ; Rudd, Ian ; Leslie, Stephen. / Patient-specific factors relating to medication adherence in a post-percutaneous coronary intervention cohort. In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 226-237.
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