Pattern and prevalence of predator damage on adult Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., returning to a river system in north-east Scotland

P M Thompson, F Mackay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There remains considerable debate over the impact of predation upon Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., populations. The pattern and prevalence of predator damage on salmon returning to a river system in North-east Scotland were recorded. Overall, 214 (19.5%) out of 1099 fish sampled were damaged, and 10 distinct categories of damage were identified. Measurements of scratches indicated that the damage was caused by a number of different factors. In particular, damage typically attributed to seals was suggested to be the result of attacks by odontocete cetaceans. These results highlight the multispecies nature of interactions between salmon and their predators, but suggest that damage levels may be of limited use in assessing the impact of different predators on salmonid population dynamics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-343
Number of pages9
JournalFisheries Management and Ecology
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Atlantic salmon
  • dolphins
  • management
  • predators
  • Salmo salar L.
  • seals
  • BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHINS
  • MORAY FIRTH
  • HARBOR
  • HABITAT

Cite this

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title = "Pattern and prevalence of predator damage on adult Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., returning to a river system in north-east Scotland",
abstract = "There remains considerable debate over the impact of predation upon Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., populations. The pattern and prevalence of predator damage on salmon returning to a river system in North-east Scotland were recorded. Overall, 214 (19.5{\%}) out of 1099 fish sampled were damaged, and 10 distinct categories of damage were identified. Measurements of scratches indicated that the damage was caused by a number of different factors. In particular, damage typically attributed to seals was suggested to be the result of attacks by odontocete cetaceans. These results highlight the multispecies nature of interactions between salmon and their predators, but suggest that damage levels may be of limited use in assessing the impact of different predators on salmonid population dynamics.",
keywords = "Atlantic salmon, dolphins, management, predators, Salmo salar L., seals, BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHINS, MORAY FIRTH, HARBOR, HABITAT",
author = "Thompson, {P M} and F Mackay",
year = "1999",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "335--343",
journal = "Fisheries Management and Ecology",
issn = "0969-997X",
publisher = "Wiley",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pattern and prevalence of predator damage on adult Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., returning to a river system in north-east Scotland

AU - Thompson, P M

AU - Mackay, F

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - There remains considerable debate over the impact of predation upon Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., populations. The pattern and prevalence of predator damage on salmon returning to a river system in North-east Scotland were recorded. Overall, 214 (19.5%) out of 1099 fish sampled were damaged, and 10 distinct categories of damage were identified. Measurements of scratches indicated that the damage was caused by a number of different factors. In particular, damage typically attributed to seals was suggested to be the result of attacks by odontocete cetaceans. These results highlight the multispecies nature of interactions between salmon and their predators, but suggest that damage levels may be of limited use in assessing the impact of different predators on salmonid population dynamics.

AB - There remains considerable debate over the impact of predation upon Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., populations. The pattern and prevalence of predator damage on salmon returning to a river system in North-east Scotland were recorded. Overall, 214 (19.5%) out of 1099 fish sampled were damaged, and 10 distinct categories of damage were identified. Measurements of scratches indicated that the damage was caused by a number of different factors. In particular, damage typically attributed to seals was suggested to be the result of attacks by odontocete cetaceans. These results highlight the multispecies nature of interactions between salmon and their predators, but suggest that damage levels may be of limited use in assessing the impact of different predators on salmonid population dynamics.

KW - Atlantic salmon

KW - dolphins

KW - management

KW - predators

KW - Salmo salar L.

KW - seals

KW - BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHINS

KW - MORAY FIRTH

KW - HARBOR

KW - HABITAT

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 335

EP - 343

JO - Fisheries Management and Ecology

JF - Fisheries Management and Ecology

SN - 0969-997X

ER -