Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations

The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner

David P. Schmitt, International Sexuality Description Project, L. Alcalay, J Allik, A. Angleitner, L. Ault, I. Austers, K. L. Bennett, Bert Timmermans, T. Vanhoomissen, F. Van Overwalle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As part of the International Sexuality Description Project, 16,954 participants from 53 nations were administered an anonymous survey about experiences with romantic attraction. Mate poaching - romantically attracting someone who is already in a relationship - was most common in Southern Europe, South America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe and was relatively infrequent in Africa, South/Southeast Asia, and East Asia. Evolutionary and social-role hypotheses received empirical support. Men were more likely than women to report having made and succumbed to short-term poaching across all regions, but differences between men and women were often smaller in more gender-egalitarian regions. People who try to steal another's mate possess similar personality traits across all regions, as do those who frequently receive and succumb to the poaching attempts by others. The authors conclude that human mate-poaching experiences are universally linked to sex, culture, and the robust influence of personal dispositions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)560-584
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Personality
personality
Eastern Europe
Southeastern Asia
Far East
human being
South America
Sexuality
South Africa
Southern Europe
Social Role
South Asia
personality traits
Southeast Asia
Western Europe
disposition
sexuality
experience
gender
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations : The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner. / Schmitt, David P.; International Sexuality Description Project; Alcalay, L.; Allik, J; Angleitner, A.; Ault, L.; Austers, I.; Bennett, K. L.; Timmermans, Bert; Vanhoomissen, T.; Van Overwalle, F.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 86, No. 4, 04.2004, p. 560-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmitt, DP, International Sexuality Description Project, Alcalay, L, Allik, J, Angleitner, A, Ault, L, Austers, I, Bennett, KL, Timmermans, B, Vanhoomissen, T & Van Overwalle, F 2004, 'Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations: The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner', Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 86, no. 4, pp. 560-584. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.86.4.560
Schmitt, David P. ; International Sexuality Description Project ; Alcalay, L. ; Allik, J ; Angleitner, A. ; Ault, L. ; Austers, I. ; Bennett, K. L. ; Timmermans, Bert ; Vanhoomissen, T. ; Van Overwalle, F. / Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations : The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2004 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 560-584.
@article{339410323eca457ead242d95663e3a91,
title = "Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations: The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner",
abstract = "As part of the International Sexuality Description Project, 16,954 participants from 53 nations were administered an anonymous survey about experiences with romantic attraction. Mate poaching - romantically attracting someone who is already in a relationship - was most common in Southern Europe, South America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe and was relatively infrequent in Africa, South/Southeast Asia, and East Asia. Evolutionary and social-role hypotheses received empirical support. Men were more likely than women to report having made and succumbed to short-term poaching across all regions, but differences between men and women were often smaller in more gender-egalitarian regions. People who try to steal another's mate possess similar personality traits across all regions, as do those who frequently receive and succumb to the poaching attempts by others. The authors conclude that human mate-poaching experiences are universally linked to sex, culture, and the robust influence of personal dispositions.",
author = "Schmitt, {David P.} and {International Sexuality Description Project} and L. Alcalay and J Allik and A. Angleitner and L. Ault and I. Austers and Bennett, {K. L.} and Bert Timmermans and T. Vanhoomissen and {Van Overwalle}, F.",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1037/0022-3514.86.4.560",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "560--584",
journal = "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-3514",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns and Universals of Mate Poaching Across 53 Nations

T2 - The Effects of Sex, Culture, and Personality on Romantically Attracting Another Person's Partner

AU - Schmitt, David P.

AU - International Sexuality Description Project

AU - Alcalay, L.

AU - Allik, J

AU - Angleitner, A.

AU - Ault, L.

AU - Austers, I.

AU - Bennett, K. L.

AU - Timmermans, Bert

AU - Vanhoomissen, T.

AU - Van Overwalle, F.

PY - 2004/4

Y1 - 2004/4

N2 - As part of the International Sexuality Description Project, 16,954 participants from 53 nations were administered an anonymous survey about experiences with romantic attraction. Mate poaching - romantically attracting someone who is already in a relationship - was most common in Southern Europe, South America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe and was relatively infrequent in Africa, South/Southeast Asia, and East Asia. Evolutionary and social-role hypotheses received empirical support. Men were more likely than women to report having made and succumbed to short-term poaching across all regions, but differences between men and women were often smaller in more gender-egalitarian regions. People who try to steal another's mate possess similar personality traits across all regions, as do those who frequently receive and succumb to the poaching attempts by others. The authors conclude that human mate-poaching experiences are universally linked to sex, culture, and the robust influence of personal dispositions.

AB - As part of the International Sexuality Description Project, 16,954 participants from 53 nations were administered an anonymous survey about experiences with romantic attraction. Mate poaching - romantically attracting someone who is already in a relationship - was most common in Southern Europe, South America, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe and was relatively infrequent in Africa, South/Southeast Asia, and East Asia. Evolutionary and social-role hypotheses received empirical support. Men were more likely than women to report having made and succumbed to short-term poaching across all regions, but differences between men and women were often smaller in more gender-egalitarian regions. People who try to steal another's mate possess similar personality traits across all regions, as do those who frequently receive and succumb to the poaching attempts by others. The authors conclude that human mate-poaching experiences are universally linked to sex, culture, and the robust influence of personal dispositions.

U2 - 10.1037/0022-3514.86.4.560

DO - 10.1037/0022-3514.86.4.560

M3 - Article

VL - 86

SP - 560

EP - 584

JO - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

SN - 0022-3514

IS - 4

ER -