People who live in countryside are less likely to survive cancer

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

It is easy to romanticise about escaping to the country, with its clean air, green space, and idyllic views. But our latest research, a review of 39 studies from around the world, suggests the need for a bit of an adjustment: it turns out that people living in rural locations are less likely to survive cancer.

We previously found that people in the northeast of Scotland who live more than an hour away from a cancer treatment centre are more likely to die within the first year after their diagnosis. We were interested in whether studies from other parts of the world also found differences between urban and rural cancer survival. We also wanted to understand reasons why people living rurally might be disadvantaged.

We previously found that people in the northeast of Scotland who live more than an hour away from a cancer treatment centre are more likely to die within the first year after their diagnosis. We were interested in whether studies from other parts of the world also found differences between urban and rural cancer survival. We also wanted to understand reasons why people living rurally might be disadvantaged.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation UK
Publication statusPublished - 11 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Countryside
  • cancer diagnosis
  • rural living
  • Cancer survival rates

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