Perceptions of partner femininity predict individual differences in men's sensitivity to facial cues of male dominance

Christopher D. Watkins, Lisa DeBruine, Anthony C Little, David R. Feinberg, Paul J. Fraccaro, Benedict C. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research suggests that men may possess adaptations that evolved to counter strategic variation in women’s preferences for masculine men. For example, women’s preferences for masculine, dominant men are stronger during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle than at other times and men demonstrate increased sensitivity to facial cues of male dominance when their partners are ovulating. Such variation in men’s dominance perceptions may promote efficient allocation of men’s mate guarding effort (i.e., allocate more mate guarding effort in response to masculine, dominant men in situations where women show particularly strong preferences for such men). Here, we tested for further evidence of adaptations that may have evolved to counter strategic variation in women’s masculinity preferences. Men who reported having particularly feminine romantic partners demonstrated a greater tendency to attribute dominance to masculinized male faces than did men who reported having relatively masculine romantic partners. This relationship between partner femininity and men’s sensitivity to facial cues of male dominance remained significant when we controlled for potential confounds (men’s age, self-rated masculinity, reported commitment to their relationship, and the length of the relationship) and may be adaptive given that feminine women demonstrate particularly strong preferences for masculine, dominant men. While previous research has emphasized variation in women’s masculinity preferences, our findings add to a growing body of research suggesting that sexual selection may also have shaped adaptations that evolved to counter such systematic variation in women’s preferences for masculine, dominant men.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-82
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Psychology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

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Femininity
femininity
Individuality
Cues
mate guarding
Masculinity
masculinity
sexual selection
woman
menstrual cycle
Research
partner relationship
Menstrual Cycle

Keywords

  • masculinity
  • dominance
  • individual differences
  • sexual conflict

Cite this

Perceptions of partner femininity predict individual differences in men's sensitivity to facial cues of male dominance. / Watkins, Christopher D.; DeBruine, Lisa; Little, Anthony C; Feinberg, David R.; Fraccaro, Paul J.; Jones, Benedict C.

In: Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 69-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watkins, Christopher D. ; DeBruine, Lisa ; Little, Anthony C ; Feinberg, David R. ; Fraccaro, Paul J. ; Jones, Benedict C. / Perceptions of partner femininity predict individual differences in men's sensitivity to facial cues of male dominance. In: Journal of Evolutionary Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 69-82.
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