Phosphorus Availability Determines the Response of Tundra Ecosystem Carbon Stocks to Nitrogen Enrichment

Lorna E. Street, Nora Mielke, Sarah J. Woodin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Northern permafrost soils contain important carbon stocks. Here we report the long-term response of carbon stocks in high Arctic dwarf shrub tundra to short-term, low-level nutrient enrichment. Twenty years after experimental nitrogen addition, carbon stocks in vegetation and organic soil had almost halved. In contrast, where phosphorus was added with nitrogen, carbon storage increased by > 50 %. These responses were explained by changes in the depths of the moss and organic soil layers. Nitrogen apparently stimulated decomposition, reducing carbon stocks, whilst phosphorus and nitrogen co-stimulated moss productivity, increasing organic matter accumulation. The altered structure of moss and soil layers changed soil thermal regimes, which may further influence decomposition of soil carbon. If climate warming increases phosphorus availability, any increases in nitrogen enrichment from soil warming or expanding human activity in the Arctic may result in increased carbon sequestration. Where phosphorus is limiting in tundra areas however, nitrogen enrichment may result in carbon loss.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1155-1167
Number of pages13
JournalEcosystems
Volume21
Issue number6
Early online date18 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Fingerprint

tundra
carbon sinks
Ecosystems
Phosphorus
Nitrogen
Carbon
Availability
phosphorus
ecosystems
Soils
ecosystem
nitrogen
carbon
moss
mosses and liverworts
carbon sequestration
organic soils
organic soil
Arctic region
warming

Keywords

  • moss
  • nutrient
  • fertilisation
  • decomposition
  • productivity
  • soil organic matter
  • soil respiration
  • cellobiohydrolase
  • ammonium
  • nitrate

Cite this

Phosphorus Availability Determines the Response of Tundra Ecosystem Carbon Stocks to Nitrogen Enrichment. / Street, Lorna E.; Mielke, Nora; Woodin, Sarah J.

In: Ecosystems, Vol. 21, No. 6, 09.2018, p. 1155-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Northern permafrost soils contain important carbon stocks. Here we report the long-term response of carbon stocks in high Arctic dwarf shrub tundra to short-term, low-level nutrient enrichment. Twenty years after experimental nitrogen addition, carbon stocks in vegetation and organic soil had almost halved. In contrast, where phosphorus was added with nitrogen, carbon storage increased by > 50 {\%}. These responses were explained by changes in the depths of the moss and organic soil layers. Nitrogen apparently stimulated decomposition, reducing carbon stocks, whilst phosphorus and nitrogen co-stimulated moss productivity, increasing organic matter accumulation. The altered structure of moss and soil layers changed soil thermal regimes, which may further influence decomposition of soil carbon. If climate warming increases phosphorus availability, any increases in nitrogen enrichment from soil warming or expanding human activity in the Arctic may result in increased carbon sequestration. Where phosphorus is limiting in tundra areas however, nitrogen enrichment may result in carbon loss.",
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author = "Street, {Lorna E.} and Nora Mielke and Woodin, {Sarah J.}",
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KW - nitrate

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